E.T. (Ed) Scovill

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Ed Scovill, ALS
ScovillE.JPG
1935-2016
Known for Professional Recognition Award (2003)


Ed Scovill passed away on Friday, May 27, 2016 at the age of 81 years. Ed Scovill was a native Calgarian whose survey career began when he enrolled at what was then called the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art.

He graduated in 1958 with a diploma in Land Survey Technology and could not have imagined, at that time, that one day he would return as an instructor and enjoy a career of over thirty years at that same institution.

Upon graduation, Ed worked as a surveyor with the City of Calgary and articled under Ken Pawson from 1962 through 1964 and became commissioned as Alberta Land Surveyor #328. In August 1967, Ed joined the drafting department at SAIT and began a teaching career that continued until his retirement in December 1999.

Through the early 1970s, Ed Scovill added a B.Sc. and B.Ed. in mathematics from the University of Calgary and a degree in Survey Engineering from the University of New Brunswick to his accomplishments. During his teaching tenure at SAIT, there were 250 Alberta Land Surveyors commissioned, approximately fifty of which, passed through those hallowed halls of learning.

Ed was known for his easy going demeanour as he enlightened us with what he called "wonderful stuff" - geodesy and survey field work. He has had in excess of 1,000 survey students flow through his classes at SAIT.

He retired as an Alberta Land Surveyor in 1998 and received the Professional Recognition Award in 2003.



By Al Jamieson, on the occasion of the presentation of the Professional Recognition Award to Ed Scovill

On behalf of my fellow nominators, Army MacCrimmon, John Horn and Wayne Fawcett, I take pleasure in introducing to you this year's recipient of the Professional Recognition Award.

This individual was once told by L.E. Harris that he was too scrawny to make a surveyor. He took this to heart and evolved into the person we know today as being large in stature and in substance.

Ed Scovill is a native Calgarian whose survey career began when he enrolled at what was then called the Provincial Institute of Technology and Art. He graduated in 1958 with a diploma in Land Survey Technology and could not have imagined, at that time, that one day he would return as an instructor and enjoy a career of over thirty years at that same institution.

Upon graduation, Ed worked as a surveyor with the City of Calgary and articled under Ken Pawson from 1962 through 1964 and became commissioned as Alberta Land Surveyor #328. In August 1967, Ed joined the drafting department at SAIT and began a teaching career that continued until his retirement in December 1999, although he is still teaching survey field work and blueprint reading courses through "continuing ed" at SAIT (no pun intended).

Through the early 1970s, Ed added a B.Sc. and B.Ed. in mathematics from the University of Calgary and a degree in Survey Engineering from the University of New Brunswick to his accomplishments. During Ed's teaching tenure at SAIT, there were 250 Alberta Land Surveyors commissioned, approximately fifty of which, passed through those hallowed halls of learning. Many of his former students are here today and, in fact, nine of this year's twenty-five year pin recipients were students of Ed.

Ed was known for his easy going demeanour as he enlightened us with what he called "wonderful stuff" - geodesy and survey field work. He has had in excess of 1,000 survey students flow through his classes at SAlT. Ed's weekends and holidays were most often spent with his wife Ann and sons at their retreat in the Invermere Valley aptly named Scovilla.

In closing, I would like to share one of Ed's experiences obtained by the Shamrock lunch circuit. While working at the City of Calgary doing control surveys using a tower, Ed was overcome with an urge to pee off the top of the tower. Upon completion of their observations, Ken Pawson insisted that he precede Ed down the ladder, concerned that Ed's large frame might leave him stranded. A brisk breeze had dictated Ed's earlier adventure that soaked down the rungs of the ladder - as Ken found out as he scampered down. This incident caused Ken to issue an inter-city memo: no peeing off survey control towers.


Mr. Scovill addressed the audience as follows:

I'd like to thank everybody for coming. It's great. I didn't know what was going to happen here. My real benefactor is Jean Pawson. When I was sick during my articleship, Jean threw Ken out in the field in the snow and I got to stay inside and do calculations, so this was a happy day. Part of the articleship when I was articling with Ken, he was in charge of the mountain rescue group and they tried to lower me off Mount Yumnuska in a litter basket. He said this is part of articleship - so you guys don't know how easy you got it. Thanks again, Ken.

Another group I'm joining are a bunch of McCutcheon men and that's good.