Place Names

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Introduction

Land surveyors in Alberta named many of the mountains, rivers, lakes and other features they were surveying. Just over 500 places in Alberta were named for or named by land surveyors. Some times, the places were named after people who worked or settled in the area or an unusual incident. Some times, the names are descriptive based on the colour of the water or the vegetation in the area. These land surveyors must have had a tremendous education as many of these names are based on Latin, Greek and, of course, First Nation origins.


Aberdeen, Mount - Ashlar Ridge

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Aberdeen, Mount 7-28-16-W5 51° 23' N 116° 14' W Approximately 55 km west north-west of Banff This mountain, which is 3,152 m in altitude, was named in 1897 by J.J. McArthur, DLS, member responsible for many of the phototopographical surveys along the railway through the Rocky Mountains. The mountain was named after Lord John Campbell Gordon, the Marquis of Aberdeen, Governor-General of Canada from 1893-1898 and a visitor to Lake Louise in 1893. 1
Adams Landing 22-108-7-W5 58° 23' N 115° 04' W On the north bank of Peace River approximately 120 km south south-east of High Level The precise origin of the name of this locality is unknown. In 1920, surveyor C.P. Hotchkiss reported in his field notes that boats of all sizes would stop at what was known as Adams Landing. 4
Adskwatim Creek 12-95-13-W6 57° 13' N 119° 57' W Flows south-west into British Columbia approximately 200 km north-west of Peace River The name was recorded in 1918 by the surveyors on the Alberta-BC Boundary Commission. Adskwatim in Cree means "many dams," referring to the abundance of beaver dams on the creek. 4
Agnes Lake 26-68-7-W5 54° 55' N 114° 58' W Approximately 175 km north-west of Edmonton The origin of the name Agnes Lake is not known although there is a suggestion it may have been named by J.N. Wallace, DLS, ALS, during his survey of the 18th baseline in 1905. 4
Aiguille Peak 6-33-19-W5 51° 48' N 116° 40' W Approximately 105 km north-west of Banff on the Alberta-BC boundary The name for this peak, which is 2,999 m in altitude, is the French word for needle. It is descriptive of the shape of the peak and was submitted by A.O. Wheeler in 1918. 1
Akuinu River 23-68-3-W5 54° 53' N 114° 21' W Flows north-west into Salteaux River approximately 41 km SE of Slave Lake In 1920, J.N. Wallace, DLS, ALS, wrote "Akuinu River, name of Indian tribes south of Chipewyans are called "Ethinyew" or Inenyew." The Cree name for Salteaux is Nak-aw-ew-iy-i-new, which is likely a corruption of this name. 4
Alcove Mountain 16-42-2-W6 52° 37' N 118° 14' W Approximately 31 km south south-west of Jasper This 2,810 m mountain was named by M.P. Bridgland in 1916. The mountain is located in a recess behind Ermite Glacier. 1
Alderson Creek 20-1-30-W4 49° 03' N 113° 58' W Flows north into Carthew Brook approximately 50 km south of Pincher Creek This creek was named in 1915 by M.P. Bridgland. It is named after Lt-General E.A.H. Alderson, KCB, who commanded the Canadian Expeditionary Force in France from 1915 to 1916. 1
Alice Creek SW-24-107-20-W4 58° 18' N 113° 12' W Flows north into Birch River approximately 195 km north north-west of Fort McMurray Originally showing on a map of 1916, it was likely named by F.V. Seibert, DLS, ALS who surveyed this area in August 1915. 4
Allan Lake SE-4-69-14-W5 54° 56' 20” N 116° 03' 30” W Approximately 70 km east south-east of Valleyview This was apparently named by W.T. Green, DLS, after his brother, Allan. It was officially approved in 1906. 4
Allison Peak 20-9-5-W5 49° 45' N 114° 39' W Approximately 16 km north-west of Coleman, on the Alberta-BC boundary The name Allison Peak was officially approved for this 2,643 m peak on July 22, 1915. M.P. Bridgland submitted the name for the memory of Douglas Allison, a former Royal North West Mounted Policeman who was an early settler in this area. 1
Alnus Peak 36-40-1-W6 52° 29' N 118° 00' W Approximately 44 km south of Jasper This 2,976 m mountain peak was named by A.O. Wheeler in 1921 after the alder (Latin, "alnus") tree, likened to the birch tree, which grows on the mountains sides. 1
Altrude Lakes 21-26-15-W5 51° 14' N 116° 03' W Approximately 35 km west north-west of Banff The name for these lakes was approved in 1952. It is said that HJ Hoffner, in charge of the survey, changed the name of the creek from "Little Vermilion," as instructed. He and his assistant, Robert U. McGuiness, derived the name Altrude from the Latin word, "altus," meaning "high" and the word "pulchritude," meaning "beautiful." 1
Amber Mountain 30-44-27-W5 52° 49' N 117° 55' W Approximately 16 km SE of Jasper The descriptive name for this mountain, whose summit is covered with amber-coloured shale, was suggested by M.P. Bridgland in 1916. 1
Amethyst Lakes 18-43-2-W6 52° 42' N 118° 16' W Approximately 22 km south-west of Jasper R.W. Cautley noted in 1921 that the name Amethyst is descriptive of the lakes' beautiful violet-coloured water. The name was made official in 1956. 1
Anderson Creek 15-50-23-W5 53° 19' N 117° 17' W Flows east into McLeod River, approximately 64 km south-east of Edson This creek was officially named in July 1927 possibly after Harold Anderson, a trapper and homesteader on the McLeod River. He was also involved in census-taking in 1937 and became part of a 1946 survey party which renamed features in the area. 1
Anderson Peak 2-1-W5 49° 08' N 114° 04' W Approximately 15 km north-west of Waterton Park This 2,652 m peak is named in honour of Lt. Samuel Anderson, RE, the Chief Astronomer of the Second British Boundary Commission of 1872-1876, from Lake ofthe Woods to the Rockies. Lt. Anderson was also the Secretary of the First British Boundary Commission of 1862-1869, surveying from the Strait of Georgia to the Rockies. 1
Annette Lake 26-45-1-W6 52° 54' N 118° 03' W Approximately 3 km north-east of Jasper This attractive lake was named in 1914 by H. Matheson of the Dominion Land Survey after the wife of Colonel S. Maynard Rogers, a superintendent of Jasper Park. 1
Aquila Mountain 29-43-1-W6 52° 44' N 118° 07' W Approximately 16 km south of Jasper There was an eagle seen at the peak at the time of naming in 1916. Aquila is the Latin for "eagle." M.P. Bridgland gave this 2,825 mountain its descriptive name. 1
Archer Lake 13-105-2-W4 58° 07' N 110° 21' W Approximately 159 km north north-east of Fort McMurray Both the lake and the creek were named after W. Archer, a member of the survey crew of F.V. Seibert, DLS, ALS, in 1915. 4
Arctomys Peak 23-34-22-W5 51° 56' N 116° 59' W Approximately 130 km north-west of Banff This 2,793 m mountain peak was named by A.O. Wheeler in 1919 after the whistling marmots (genus arctomys columbianus) seen in the valley. 1
Arcturus Peak 34-51-5-W6 53° 27' N 118° 41' W Approximately 74 km north-west of Jasper. Arcturus is a character from Greek mythology. The name means "little bear." Arcturus is one of the five brightest stars in the night sky. This mountain, first named by R.W. Cautley, was officially named May 1, 1934 and is part of the Starlight Range. 1
Aries Peak 33-32-19-W5 51° 47' N 116° 38' W Approximately 100 km north-west of Banff on the Alberta-BC boundary This 2,996 m mountain peak was named by A.O. Wheeler in 1918 after the wild sheep (also known as Aries) seem on the mountain. 1
Armstrong, Mount 16-6-W5 50° 21' N 114° 46' W Approximately 49 km south-west of Turner Valley J.D. Armstrong was killed in action April 12, 1917. It is for this member of the Surveyor General's staff that this mountain, 2823 m in altitude, was named. 1
Arris Mountain 8-42-2-W6 52° 46' N 118° 15' W Approximately 16 km south-west of Jasper The name for this 2,705 m mountain overlooking the Crescent Valley is synonymous with arete and is descriptive of the geographical features found there. The name was applied in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. 1
Ashlar Ridge 36-48-27-W5 53° 11' N 117° 48' W Approximately 32 km south-west of Hinton The descriptive name for this ridge, which resembles a smooth wall, was suggested by M.P. Bridgland in 1916. Ashlar is a form of masonry. 1

Barber Lake - Buttress Mountain

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Barber Lake 11-105-6-W4 58° 06' N 110° 52' W Approximately 148 km north of Fort McMurray It was named after H.G. Barber, DLS. The name shows as early as 1919 of federal government maps. 4
Baril Lake 112-10-W4 58° 46' N 111° 41' W Approximately 219 km north of Fort McMurray The lake was named in 1916 by J.A. Fletcher, DLS, after M.C.L. Baril of the Surveyor General's staff who was killed in action on November 9, 1915. There is also a mountain peak south-west of Turner Valley named after him. 4
Baril Peak 34-15-6-W5 50° 18' N 114° 45' W Approximately 52 km south-west of Turner Valley M.C.L. Baril of the Surveyor General's staff was killed in action November 9, 1915. This 2,998 m mountain was named after him. 1
Barwell, Mount 17-21-5-W5 50° 47' N 114° 39' W Approximately 40 km south-west of Calgary This mountain, which is 1,829 m in altitude, was named in 1916 after C.S.W. Barwell of the Dominion Land Survey. He was an assistant to A.O. Wheeler on surveys in 1895-1896 and subsequently moved to the Yukon. 1
Base Line Lake 35-60-13-W6 54° 14' N 119° 51' W Approximately 62 km north-west of Grande Prairie The name for this lake was officially adopted December 4, 1958 and is descriptive of the lake's location - it sits on the 16th Baseline. A camera station was located neary during the Interprovincial Boundary Survey, 1918-1924. 1
Baseline Creek 31-36-10-W5 52° 08' 00” N 115° 25' 45” W Approximately 42 km south-west of Rocky Mountain House This name, officially adopted November 8, 1978, was given to this mountain because it lies on the 10th Baseline. 1
Basilica Mountain 22-44-3-W6 52° 48' N 118° 20' W Approximately 9 km south south-west of Jasper The name for this mountain, 2,865 m in altitude, was given by M.P. Bridgland in 1916. The mountain has a fancied resemblance to a royal palace law courts or assembly hall, commonly known as a basilica. 1
Bastion Peak 15-43-3-W6 52° 43' N 118° 20' W Approximately 26 km south-west of Jasper This mountain peak, which is 2,970 m in altitude, has a sharp projecting peak resembling a bastion. The name was suggested by Dr. Edouard Deville and was officially approved in 1916. 1
Baxter Lakes 30-45-5-W4 52° 53' N 110° 43' W Approximately 14 km north-east of the town of Wainwright These lakes were named for Mr. Baxter, the driver of the supply team of the survey party who conducted a survey of the area some time around 1914. 3
Beacon Peak 20-41-2-W6 52° 32' N 118° 15' W Approximately 39 km south south-west of Jasper This 2,986 m mountain was named in 1922 by A.O. Wheeler. The name is descriptive of the peak's isolated position. 1
Bearhead Creek 18-81-19-W5 56° 01' N 116° 58' W Flows north-west into Heart River approximately 30 km south-east of Peace River The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown; however, it was referred to by this name by H.W. Selby, DLS, during his survey in 1908. 4
Beaton Creek 1-87-24-W5 56° 31' N 117° 41' W Flows south-east into Whitemud River approximately 39 km north-west of Peace River It was named after A Beaton, the axeman on the 1913 survey crew of G.A. Tipper, DLS, ALS. 4
Beatty Lake 14-125-1-W6 59° 51' 53” N 118° 02' 50” W Approximately 153 km north north-west of High Level This lake was named by J.R. Akins, DLS, during his 1915 survey of the 6th Meridian. The person for whom the lake was named was not stated in Akins' field correspondence. It was most probably named after one of three colleagues, all called Beatty. James Edward Beatty of Sarnia Ontario commissioned Dominion Land Surveyor on November 18, 1904; Frank Weldon Beatty of Pembroke Ontario, or William Benjamin Beatty, both of whom were commissioned Dominion Land Surveyors on May 18, 1914. There is also a possibility that Beatty refers to one of two earlier Dominion Land Surveyors who received their commission on April 14, 1872, David Beatty and Walter Beatty. 4
Beaupre, Mount 11-47-5-W6 53° 02' N 118° 37' W Approximately 40 km west north-west of Jasper This mountain, 2,778 m in altitude, was named in 1923 by A.O. Wheeler. It was named after a guide of the Canadian Pacific exploration pary of 1872 led by Sandford Fleming. 1
Beauvert Lake 15-45-1-W6 52° 53' N 118° 03' W Approximately 1km east of Jasper The name for this lake was suggested by H. Matheson, DLS, in 1914. The lake was originally called Horseshoe Lake because of its shape but, to avoid duplication, the name was changed to describe the "beautiful green" colouring ranging through every tone from pale aquamarine to jade and malachite. 1
Beaver Bluffs 49-1-W5 53° 13' N 118° 04' W Approximately 37 km north of Jasper This high, steep ridge was named by M.P. Bridgland in 1916 after the numerous beaver found along the Athabasca River. 1
Beaver River 6-94-10-W4 57° 35' N 110° 07' W Flows north north-east into Athabasca River approximately 55 km north of Fort McMurray The precise origin of the name of this river is unknown; it probably denotes the presence of the ubiquitous beaver. It was recorded by A.D. Griffin, DLS, in 1915. 4
Beaverskin Creek 25-105-13-W6 58° 09' N 120° 00' W Flows west north-west into British Columbia approximately 50 km south-west of Rainbow Lake Beaverskin Creek is a translation of the Slavey name for this creek and was adopted in 1952 when a unique name was required by a boundary survey party. 4
Beavertail Creek 5-22-73-11-W6 56° 20' N 119° 37' W Flows north-east into Beaverlodge River approximately 50 km north-west of Grande Prairie Officially named in 1947 at the suggestion of a survey party for the beaver found in this creek. In 1909, when the Dominion Land Survey came through the area, the surveyor listed no name for the creek. When the federal government map of 1917 was published, the creek was called Alex Creek. 4
Behan 35-72-10-W5 55° 17' N 110° 26' W Approximately 70 km north north-east of Lac La Biche There have been two suggested origins of the name. The 1928 version of Place Names of Alberta stated it was named after the nearby lake which was, in turn, named after the cook on the survey party of G.H. Blanchet, DLS. 4
Behanhouse Creek 36-26-6-W5 51° 15' N 114° 43' W Flows south-east into Ranche Creek, approximately 40 km west north-west of Calgary. The name for this creek was officially approved April 23, 1940. Mr. Behan was a cook on a survey party. 2
Belyea Lake NE-14-121-1-W4 59° 31' N 110° 03' W Approximately 310 km north north-east of Fort McMurray Named after A.P.C. Belyea. 4
Bennington Peak 36-42-3-W6 52° 39' N 118° 18' W Approximately 29 km south south-west of Jasper This 3,263 m mountain peak is a peak of Mount Fraser. It was named by A.O. Wheeler in 1922 after Bennington, Vermont, where Simon Fraser was born. 1
Bergeron Creek 17-100-20-W4 57° 41' N 113° 15' W Flows south-west into Birch River 155 km north-west of Fort McMurray It is likely named by F.V. Seibert, DLS, ALS, while he and his crew surveyed the 27th Baseline in 1914. The baseline crosses the creek. The map compiled from the survey shows the name Bergeron Creek. 4
Bergne, Mount 23-32-21-W5 51° 46' N 116° 52' W Approximately 110 km north-west of Banff Frank Bergne was a member of the Alpine Club (London). He was killed while climbing with A.O. Wheeler in 1907 in Switzerland. This 3,176 m mountain was named by Wheeler in 1920 after Bergne. 1
Bertha Peak 1-30-W4 49° 03' N 113° 56' W Approximately 50 km south of Pincher Creek The three features Bertha Creek, Lake and Peak are said to be named after an early resident of Waterton Lakes National Park. The name was first used on a map of the Crowsnest Forest Reserve by M.P. Bridgland in 1914. No details are known about the person after whom these features were named. 1
Bewley Island 6-84-21-W5 56° 15' N 117° 18' W Large island in Peace River approximately 3 km north of the town of Peace River The precise origin of the name of this island is unknown; the name was recorded by J.S. Galletley, DLS, in 1912. 4
Biollo Lake 33--14-W4 54° 40' 30” N 112° 03' 00” W Approximately 7 km west of Lac La Biche This lake was named in honour of Oliver John Biollo (1883-?), pioneer farmer in this district, which he named Venice after his home city. He had been working with an early survey crew which happened to be plotting out a road survey in the vicinity of this lake, and the surveyors named the feature after Mr. Biollo, in appreciation for his help. 3
Birch Creek 32-76-7-W4 55° 38' N 111° 03' W Flows east into Christmas Lake approximately 105 km north-east of Lac La Biche The name was recorded by W.H. Waddell, DLS, ALS, when he and his crew were surveying in the area in 1915. The name is likely descriptive of the local flora. 4
Birch Hills 77-W6 55° 41' N 118° 15' W Approximately 65 km north-east of Grande Prairie The name is apparently a translation of the Cree word "waskwai." In the 1902 Dominion Land Surveyor's field notes it is referred to as Fairfield's Birch Hills but changed to Birch Hills in the final report. 4
Birch Mountain 16-98-20-W4 57° 30' N 113° 10' W Approximately 138 km north-west of Fort McMurray The precise origin of the name is probably descriptive. The name was recorded by A.W. Ponton, DLS, ALS, in 1910 and is likely the feature referred to by George Simpson in 1920 as Bark Mountain. Its elevation is 823 metres. 4
Bisset Lake 34-68-2-W5 54° 56' N 114° 13' W Approximately 48 km south-east of Slave Lake It was named before 1914 and likely took its name from survey crew members who surveyed the 18th Baseline in 1905. 4
Bistre, Mount 4-49-2-W6 53° 12' N 118° 13' W Approximately 38 km north north-west of Jasper The descriptive name for this 2,346 m mountain was suggested by M.P. Bridgland in 1916 from the warm brown colour of the feature. 1
Bivouac Creek 24-106-13-W6 58° 12' 22” N 120° 00' 00” W Flows north north-west into British Columbia approximately 50 km south-west of Rainbow Lake The name was recorded by the Alberta-British Columbia Boundary Survey in 1950-1951. The name bivouac implies that the boundary survey named the creek after camping there a short while. 4
Blackhorn Peak 25-42-2-W6 52° 39' N 118° 09' W Approximately 26 km south of Jasper The descriptive name for this sharp, black mountain, 3,000 m in altitude, was given in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. 1
Blackrock Mountain 36-41-3-W6 52° 34' N 118° 17' W Approximately 37 km south south-west of Jasper The name for this 2,910 m mountain is descriptive. A.O. Wheeler give it its name in 1922. 1
Blackspring Ridge 12-32-22-W4 50° 04' N 112° 57' W Approximately 35 km north of Lethbridge. The ridge, which extends in a north-south direction, was surveyed in 1883 by Charles Magrath and commands a fine view of the countryside. 2
Blanchet Lake 5-89-20-W4 56° 41' N 113° 09' W Approximately 107 km west of Fort McMurray Named after Guy Haughton Blanchet, DLS (1884-1966), who worked in this area during 1911 and 1912. He had recorded the name for the feature as Island Lake. Blanchet graduated from McGill University in 1905 and received his Dominion Lands Surveyor commission in 1910. He had a long career in the Canadian North, running township lines and baselines, as well as working on position of the Alberta-Saskatchewan boundary. In 1929, he was involved in the first search and rescue operation using aircraft in the Arctic, when the C.D.H. MacAlpine party got lost along the coast near Coppermine. Blanchet enlisted in the Royal Canadian Artillery in 1942, but was seconded to work on the Canol pipeline project. Afterwards, he spent several years surveying the Mackenzie watershed before finally retiring. This lake was not officially named until 1974. 4
Bluff Mountain 12-8-4-W5 49° 38' N 114° 25' W Approximately 3 km north-east of Blairmore in the Blairmore Range This 2,145 m mountain was named in 1902. Its name is descriptive of a high steep bank or cliff. It was officially named by M.P. Bridgland in 1915. 1
Bohn Lake 2-80-5-W4 55° 54' N 110° 41' W Approximately 90 km south south-east of Fort McMurray The lake was named in 1914 after the explorer on F.V. Seibert's survey crew, F.O. Bohn. 4
Boivin Creek 26-82-17-W4 56° 08' N 112° 33' W Flows north-west into Athabasca River approximately 96 km south-west of Fort McMurray The creek was named after E. Boivin, DLS who worked along Range 17 in 1914. 4
Bolton Creek NW-10-107-23-W4 58° 17' N 113° 46' W Flows north into Birch River approximately 195 km east of High Level It appears on a federal government map of 1916 and is likely named after a survey crew member. 4
Bolton, Mount 16-6-W5 50° 20' N 114° 48' W Approximately 52 km south-west of Turner Valley L.E.S. Bolton, DLS, was a member of the Surveyor General's staff in Ottawa. He was killed in action in the First World War in June 1916. This mountain, 2,706 m in altitude, was named in his honour. 1
Bowden 23-34-1-W5 51° 55' 50” N 114° 02' 00” W Approximately 42 km south south-west of Red Deer There are three explanations for the origin of the name. The most widely accepted version says that a surveyor named Williamson suggested that this siding on the Edmonton-Calgary Trail take the maiden name of his wife. 3
Bowesman Lake 4-89-24-W5 56° 41' N 116° 46' W Approximately 28 km south south-west of Manning A survey of 1912 left the lake unnamed but, by 1923, the name began to appear on township plans, which were compiled from the survey of F.V. Seibert in 1921. It was likely named after a survey crew member. 4
Brander Lake 2-109-1-W4 58° 26' N 110° 03' W Approximately 200 km north north-east of Fort McMurray One possible origin of the name is that the lake is part of a group of features surveyed along the 28th Baseline in the mid-1910s, and that it was named after a survey crew member. 4
Breaker Mountain 32-19-W5 51° 46' N 116° 39' W Approximately 100 km north-west of Banff on the Alberta-BC boundary This 3,058 m mountain was named by A.O. Wheeler in 1918. The name describes the snow formation on the mountain. 1
Briant Creek 1-13-77-1-W4 55° 40' N 110° 00' W Flows south into Saskatchewan approximately 135 km south-east of Fort McMurray The creek first appears on federal government maps in 1917. It is likely named after L.D. Briant, a chainman on the J.N. Wallace survey crew in the area in 1909. 4
Bridgland Creek 16-32-10-W5 51° 45' N 115° 21' W Flows south-east into James River approximately 65 km north north-east of Banff The name for this creek was officially approved December 17, 1941. 1
Bridgland, Mount 16-46-4-W6 52° 57' N 118° 32' W Approximately 32 km west north-west of Jasper This 2,930 m mountain was named in 1918 after Morrison Parsons Bridgland. He was born and educated in Toronto and had a background in mathematics and physics. He first came west in 1902 as an assistant to A.O. Wheeler. Bridgland was a founding member of the Alpine Club of Canada. 1
Bruce Lake 4-69-2-W5 54° 57' N 114° 14' W Approximately 51 km south-east of Slave Lake It was named before 1914, and took its name from survey crew member Charles Bruce, one of the crew which surveyed the 18th Baseline in 1905. 4
Brush Mountain 35-69-18-W5 55° 02' N 116° 37' W Approximately 43 km east of Valleyview The name was officially adopted in the early 1950s after a field survey was conducted in the area. It is possibly descriptive of the vegetation on the feature, which is fairly visible because of the comparatively flat surrounding terrain. Its elevation is 900 metres. 4
Buchan Lake 34-126-6-W5 60° 00' N 114° 57' W Approximately 203 km north north-east of High Level Officially approved in 1944, it was named by C.B.C. Donnelly, DLS, ALS after an observation plane pilot. 4
Buchanan Close North of Rabbit Hill Road, east of Terwillegar Drive, Edmonton This road is named in honour of two men, both of whom were named Buchanan but were not related. John Alexander Buchanan was a Canadian senator and a long-time Edmonton resident. He was born in Ontario and came to Edmonton in 1910, where he worked for the federal government. He did considerable survey work in the Peace River country and the Northwest Territories. Buchanan was a prominent member of the Conservative Party and was appointed to the Senate in 1959, retiring six years later. The name was approved in 1988. 5
Buchanan Creek 14-91-21-W5 56° 53' N 117° 15' W Flows east into Peace River, 22 km east south-east of Manning Named after John Alexander Buchanan, DLS, ALS. The name shows on a 1919 survey map as Bear Creek. 4
Buckston Lake 27-107-12-W4 58° 19' N 111° 55' W Flows north-west into Lake Claire approximately 170 km north north-west of Fort McMurray Officially named in 1914 after A. Scott Buckston, DLS. 4
Buffalo Hill 23-103-14-W5 57° 57' N 116° 12' W Approximately 82 km south-east of High Level The name shows on a 1916 survey map as Buffalo Head Hills and is part of this set of hills. 4
Burnt River 19-100-3-W5 57° 42' N 114° 29' W Flows south-west into Mikkwa River approximately 184 km south-east of High Level The precise origin of the name of this river is unknown. It may have been an area burned out by forest fire at the time. J.B. St. Cyr, DLS, recorded the name during a survey in 1909. 4
Buttress Lake 32-42-1-W6 52° 39' N 118° 07' W Approximately 24 km south of Jasper The descriptive name for this lake was applied by M.P. Bridgland in 1916 because of the numerous cliffs around it. 1
Buttress Mountain 28-46-2-W6 52° 59' N 118° 13' W Approximately 10 km north north-west of Jasper This 2,685 m mountain was named by M.P. Bridgland in 1916. 1

Cabin Lake - Cyclamen Ridge

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Cabin Lake 18-45-1-W6 52° 53' N 118° 07' W Approximately 3 km west of Jasper This lake and the nearby creek were named in 1914 by H. Matheson, DLS. The water supply for Jasper is obtained from this source. No other information about the origin of this name is available. 1
Cache Creek 2-100-18-W5 57° 39' N 116° 50' W Flows north-west into Wolverine River approximately 94 km north-east of Manning The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown, although it is an indication that someone kept a cache in this area. The name was recorded by J.A. Fletcher, DLS, surveying in the area in 1913. 4
Cache Lake 17-52-26-W5 53° 29' N 117° 52' W Approximately 17 km north-west of Hinton Cache Lake gets its name because A.H. Hawkins of the Dominion Land Survey, who ran the Fifteenth and Sixteenth baselines, had a supply of iron posts and food packed into a cache here. 1
Cairngorm Mountain 2-46-2-W6 52° 56' N 118° 12' W Approximately 10 km north-west of Jasper Cairngorm is Gaelic for "blue-green mountain." There is a mountain range in Scotland called Cairngorm Mountains. The name for this feature was applied in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. The mountain measures 2,610 m in altitude. 1
Caldron Lake 36-31-19-W5 51° 42' N 116° 34' W Approximately 90 km north-west of Banff This lake was named by A.O. Wheeler in 1918. The kettle-shaped rock depression is reminiscent of a cauldron leading to its descriptive name. 1
Cameron Creek 17-86-20-W5 56° 27' N 117° 06' W Flows north-west into Peace River approximately 27 km north north-east of Peace River The was named after an early settler in the area. The Dominion Land Survey at one time recorded a more colourful name for the feature, Rat Root Creek. 4
Cameron Hills 23-125-1-W6 59° 48' N 118° 00' W Approximately 153 km north north-east of High Level These hills were officially named in 1921 for Maxwell George Cameron, an assistant on a survey crew. He later became chief cartographer of the Surveys and Mapping Branch in Ottawa, 1948-1951. 4
Capitol Mountain 10-48-27-W5 53° 08' N 117° 50' W Approximately 37 km south south-west of Hinton This 2,438 m mountain was given its name in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. It has an imposing position south-east of Roche Miette. 1
Caribou River 13-109-12-W5 58° 28' N 115° 51' W Flows south into Peace River approximately 75 km east south-east of High Level When J.S. Galletly, DLS surveyed the area in 1913, he referred to the feature as "Caribou or Deer River." 4
Carl Creek 24-111-12-W5 58° 39' N 115° 53' W Flows south into Caribou River approximately 73 km east north-east of High Level Named by J.R. Akins, DLS, during his 1914 survey of the 29th Baseline for Carl Sanderson, a trapper from Fort Vermilion. Sanderson was an axeman on Akins' survey party in 1914 and 1915. 4
Carson Creek 36-60-13-W5 54° 14' N 115° 47' W south-west in Sakwatamau River approximately 13 km north-west of Whitecourt The name for this creek has appeared on federal government maps as early as 1917 but its precise origin is not known. It may be have been named after a survey crew member. 4
Carthew, Mount 13-1-1-W5 49° 02' N 114° 00' W Approximately 8 km west of Waterton Park William Morden Carthew was R.W. Cautley's assistant and climbed this mountain to act as a signal for his colleague. Carthew was killed in Ypres on June 1, 1916. 1
Cascade Rapids 8-89-2-W4 56° 42' 08N 110° 16' 52W Approximately 69 km east of Fort McMurray in the Clearwater River These rapids have been known by this name since at least 1888 in which year they appeared in a survey report. 4
Castleguard Mountain 35-23-W5 52° 07' N 117° 15' W Approximately 100 km south-east of Jasper This 3,090 m mountain was named by A.O. Wheeler in 1919, owing to its castellated appearance and the fact that it rises as a guardian over the southern portion of the Columbia Icefield. 1
Catacombs Mountain 12-40-27-W5 52° 26' N 117° 45' W Approximately 55 km south-east of Jasper This mountain, which is 3,330 m in altitude, was named in 1921 by A.O. Wheeler. The feature has an alcove formation, likened to an underground burial torab containing such recesses. 1
Cautley, Mount 22-12-W5 50° 54' N 115° 34' W Approximately 100 km west of Calgary This 2,888 m mountain was officially named in 1917 after Richard William Cautley (1873-1953). 1
Centre Mountain 31-44-27-W5 52° 50' N 117° 55' W Approximately 14 km east south-east of Jasper This mountain is located between the heads of two valleys halfway between Excelsior and Amber mountains. The name was applied to the feature in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. 1
Chak Peak 19-43-1-W6 52° 43' N 118° 08' W Approximately 19 km south south-west of Jasper This mountain, which is 2,774 m in altitude, bears the native name for "eagle." It was given the name by M.P. Bridgland and it was officially approved in 1916. 1
Chalmers Creek 27-69-9-W5 55° 00' N 115° 17' W Flows north north-west into Swan River approximately 24 km north-east of Swan Hills Likely named after Thomas Chalmers, DLS. 4
Chester Creek 1-96-18-W5 57° 18' N 116° 46' W Flows north into Cache Creek, 67 km north-east of Manning The feature is likely named after Chester Day, a chainman on the J.A. Fletcher survey crew of 1913. 4
Chetamon Mountain 11-47-2-W6 53° 03' N 118° 13' W Approximately 23 km north north-west of Jasper Chetamon is the Stoney Indian word for "squirrel." Two rocks on the mountain resemble the small animal. M.P. Bridgland suggested the descriptive name for this 2,504 m mountain in 1916. 1
Chevron Mountain 30-42-1-W6 52° 38' N 118° 07' W Approximately 26 km south of Jasper A chevron may be defined as a bent bar with an inverted "V" shape. This mountain, which stands 2,835 m in altitude, is double pointed. It was given this descriptive name in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. 1
Chickadee Creek 18-60-13-W5 54° 12' N 115° 57' W Flows south-east into Athabasca River approximately 17 km west north-west of Whitecourt The name for this creek was mentioned as early as 1912 by J.S. Galletly, DLS, and likely refers to the abundance of the bird in the area. 4
Chinchaga River 6-114-2-W6 58° 53' N 118° 19' W Flows north into Hay River approximately 75 km north-east of Rainbow Lake This name was recorded by Dominion Land Surveyor William Ogilvie in 1891. Ogilvie translated the name to mean beautiful or wonderful. However, according to a later surveyor, J.R. Akins, in 1915, as well as local residents in the 1980s, the name means "Big Wood River" or "Big Timber River," due to the large spruce trees along the river bank. 4
Chinook Creek 19-66-13-W6 54° 44' N 119° 57' W Flows north into Wapiti River, approximately 90 km south-west of Grande Prairie Chinook Ridge crosses the Alberta-BC boundary and forms the watershed between Mistanusk and Chinook creeks. The creek is named for the ridge and both have been in use since the Alberta-BC Boundary Survey, 1918-1924. 1
Christina Lake 32-76-6-W4 55° 38' N 110° 55' W Approximately 115 km north-east of Lac La Biche When William Christie, DLS, surveyed this area in 1910, he referred to it as Narrows Lake. Because the name was duplicated elsewhere, the Surveyor General, Edouard Deville, found the name objectionable and ordered Christie to identify this feature as Christina Lake in his final report. The name is apparently in honour of Christine Gordon, a Scotswoman who made her home in Fort McMurray. Miss Gordon came to Canada to join her brother, William Gordon. 4
Christine Lake 17-45-2-W6 52° 53' N 118° 14' W Approximately 11 km west of Jasper This lake was named in 1917 by H. Matheson of the Dominion Land Survey but its origin is unknown. 1
Cinquefoil Mountain 14-47-28-W5 53° 03' N 118° 00' W Approximately 50 km south south-west of Hinton The cinquefoil, a five petalled, bright gold shrub, is a type of rose which grows in the valley below this 2,259 m mountain. The small yellow wildflower grows on exposed slopes in high altitudes of the Rocky Mountains. The creek is named after the mountain. M.P. Bridgland gave this mountain its name in 1916. 1
Citadel Peak 24-13-W5 51° 01' N 115° 44' W Approximately 21 km south-west of Banff This mountain peak, which is 2,610 m in altitude, was named by A.O. Wheeler after its fortress-like shape. 1
Clairmont Lake 30-72-W6 55° 16' N 118° 46' W Approximately 6 km north of Grande Prairie Named by Walter McFarlane, DLS, ALS, who surveyed the area first in 1909. It was a variant spelling of his birthplace in Ontario, Claremont. He liked the area so much that he applied for a homestead there. 4
Clark Lake 6-61-18-W5 54° 15' N 116° 41' W Approximately 16 km south south-east of Fox Creek It is noted on a federal government map of 1916. Since it is approximately one kilometre north of the 16th Baseline, it was likely named after a survey crew member. 4
Cliff Mountain 28-47-2-W6 53° 05' N 118° 13' W Approximately 25 km north north-west of Jasper The steep cliffs along each face of this 2,743 m mountain suggested its descriptive name to M.P. Bridgland in 1916. 1
Clitheroe, Mount 16-43-2-W6 52° 43' N 118° 14' W Approximately 23 km south south-west of Jasper This mountain, which stands 2,747 m in altitude, was named by M.P. Bridgland in 1916. It takes its name from a municipal borough of Lancashire, England, home of the Clitheroe Royal Grammar School. The name means "hill of loose stones" and is descriptive of the large deposits of limestone in the area. 1
Clouston Creek 9-11-75-22-W5 55° 29' N 117° 17' W Flows north into Wabatanisk Creek, approximately 50 km north of Valleview. For Noel Stewart Clouston, as assistant on the survey crew of L. Brenot in 1920. Clouston apparently rejoined the party at this creek after recovering from an accident. 4
Clyde Lake 24-82-3-W6 56° 08' N 118° 19' W Approximately 6 km north-east of Fairview Named after Clyde White, a member of the party that surveyed the 19th Baseline in 1912. 4
Coal Ridge 11-60-14-W6 54° 10' N 119° 59' W Approximately 63 km north-west of Grande Prairie There are many deposits and seams of coal found in the area. This ridge has been known as Coal Ridge since the Alberta-BC Boundary Survey, 1918-1924, but the name did not become official until 1959. 1
Colonel Pass 23-47-6-W6 53° 03' N 118° 46' W Approximately 51 km west north-west of Jasper Colonel Peak, Pass and Creek were so named by A.O. Wheeler in 1911 after Colonel Aime Laussedat (1819-1907, an engineer in the French army who was the originator of the science of phototopography so extensively used for survey purposes in the mountain regions of the country. 1
Condor Peak 33-32-14-W5 51° 48' N 115° 55' W Approximately 75 km north-west of Banff The name for this peak is suggestive of mountain eagles and was proposed by R.W. Cautley, ALS. 1
Conifer Creek 10-45-2-W6 52° 52' N 118° 12' W Flows north-east into Miette River, approximately 8 km west of Jasper This creek runs through an area which is thickly forested with evergreens. Near the bottom of the creek there is a small waterfall. Its descriptive name was applied in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. 1
Cote Crescent North of Cumberland Road, south of 149 Avenue, west of 131 Street, Edmonton Jean Leon Cote (1867-1924) was a pioneer land surveyor and politician. He worked for the Department of the Interior for about five years before forming a partnership with the Cautley brothers (Richard and Reginald). In 1909, Cote became a member of parliament for the Athabasca riding. In 1918, he was named to the Alberta cabinet as provincial secretary and was also Minister of Mines and Railways. In 1919, Cote helped form the Scientific and Industrial Research Council of Alberta. He was named to the Senate in 1923. 5
Cottonwood Creek 6-82-4-W4 56° 05' N 110° 36' W Flows east south-east into Christina River approximately 86 km south south-east of Fort McMurray G.H. Blanchet, DLS, in his report of July 1911 noted there was "dense cottonwood around the river." By 1914, it appears named on the sectional map derived from the surveys done three years before. 4
Coutts River 14-68-4-W5 54° 53' N 114° 30' W Flows north-east into the Salteaux River approximately 48 km south south-east of Slave Lake It was officially named prior to 1906 after G.M. Coutts, a member of a survey party who came from Leith, now a district of Edinburgh Scotland and died around 1911. 4
Cowper Creek 11-81-4-W4 56° 00' N 110° 30' W Flows north into Winefred River approximately 85 km south-east of Fort McMurray Officially approved in 1955, it was named for George Constable Cowper, a Dominion Land Surveyor. The name is listed in the Dominion Land Survey report of 1913 and is listed as Cowpar Creek and Lake. 4
Cox Hill 27-23-7-W5 50° 59' N 114° 55' W Approximately 50 km west of Calgary. This foothill was named in 1896 by A.O. Wheeler after an assistant of his named Cox. The name was officially approved October 6, 1949. 1
Craven Lake 31-85-23-W5 56° 25' N 117° 36' W Approximately 24 km north of Grimshaw This lake is named after A. Craven, the cook on the 1913 survey crew of G.A. Tipper, DLS, ALS, who were working in the area this year. 4
Crooked Rapids 5-88-12-W4 56° 36' N 111° 52' W In a bend in the Athabasca River approximately 31 km west south-west of Fort McMurray These rapids received their name because of a hairpin turn the river makes around a limestone point at this location. The name was recorded as early as 1914 by A.D. Griffin, DLS. 4
Cummock, Mount 26-48-2-W6 53° 10' N 118° 11' W Approximately 34 km north north-west of Jasper This 2,460 m mountain was named in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland after Cummock, Ayrshire, Scotland. It means "meeting of waters." 1
Curator Mountain 9-44-27-W5 52° 47' N 117° 50' W Approximately 19 km south-east of Jasper This 2,622 m mountain was named in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland for its position as "custodian" of Shovel Pass. 1
Curia Mountain 15-44-3-W6 52° 48' N 118° 20' W Approximately 19 km south south-west of Jasper Named in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland, this mountain resembles the shape of a Roman senate house, or curia. The Roman tradition states that Romulus divided the people into three political "tribes" which each had families of "curiae." One of the principal buildings of ancient Rome was the curia, and along with the Basilica and Rostrum, the political, religious and judicial lives of the people were housed. The three features, Basilica Mountain, Curia Mountain (2,835 m) and Rostrum Hill, surround the valley known as "The Forum." 1
Currie Lake 27-104-5-W4 58° 03' N 110° 44' W Approximately 144 km north of Fort McMurray The name appears on maps as early as 1916 and, although the origin is not precisely known, the lake may have been named after a survey crew member. 4
Cyclamen Ridge 13-5-W5 50° 04' N 114° 33' W Approximately 55 km south south-west of Turner Valley The name Cyclamen Ridge was proposed by M.P. Bridgland on June 30, 1915. This ridge is approximately 2,256 m in altitude and is named for the wildflower of the same name. 1

Dalkin Island - Dryden Creek

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Dalkin Island 31-99-9-W4 57° 38' N 111° 28' W Approximately 100 km north of Fort McMurray Named for T.W. Dalkin, an instrument man on a survey in the area in 1922. 4
Daphne Island 25-95-11-W4 57° 16' 40” N 111° 39' 30” W Approximately 65 km north north-west of Fort McMurray Named after Daphne, daughter of J.N. Wallace, DLS, ALS, in 1925. 4
Darling Creek 23-95-5-W5 57° 15' N 114° 42' W Flows north-west into Panny River approximately 180 km east north-east of Manning This was named after trail locator L. Darling, who worked on the crews of J.S. Fletcher, DLS. 4
David, Mount 18-33-20-W5 51° 50' N 116° 49' W Approximately 115 km north-west of Banff This 2,780 m mountain, the nearby creek and lake were named in 1920 after David Thompson (1770-1857) who travelled through the adjacent Howe Pass in 1806-1807. From 1816-1826, he was employed in surveying the border between Canada and the United States. 1
Deadman Creek 23-84-17-W4 56° 18' N 112° 35' W Flows north into Athabasca River approximately 87 km south-west of Fort McMurray The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown but it is probably descriptive of its potential dangers as a death trap. The water from the creek entering Athabasca River is rough above the nearby Grand Rapids. The name was in use when H.S. Day, DLS, ALS surveyed the area in 1914. 4
Deep Creek NE-23-73-20-W5 55° 20' N 116° 57' W Flows east into Little Smoky River approximately 30 km south-west of High Prairie The name has been in use since before the turn of the century. The origin is not necessarily descriptive for the surveyors in the area do not show the creek to be particuarly deep. 4
Deer Mountain 68-8-W5 54° 55' N 115° 10' W Approximately 22 km north-east of Swan Hills The name was recorded as Deer Hills by Thomas Chalmers, DLS, in 1897. In that year, he surveyed a route through the Swan Hills as a possible overland route to the Klondike. It shows on a map from 1914 as Deer Mountain. For a time in 1922 there was brief consideration given to renaming it Chalmers Hill; the Geographic Board of Canada believed Chalmers too important to be commemorated by such an "unimportant peak" but he never did get anything more prominent named after him in Alberta. The elevation of the feature is 1,067 metres. It is one of the three features which comprise Swan Hills. 4
Delorme Lake SW-26-70-3-W5 55° 05' N 114° 21' W Approximately 35 km south-east of Slave River Although the origin of the name is not known, it was given to the lake between 1914 and 1922. It was likely named after V. Delorme who served as a picketman on the crew of H.W. Selby, DLS, 1909. 4
Delta Glacier 11-32-19-W5 51° 44' N 116° 35' W Approximately 95 km north-west of Banff A.O. Wheeler named this glacier, the source of the Delta Creek, in 1918 after the wide delta found at the lower end of the creek. 1
Devil Lake 16-108-17-W5 58° 22' N 116° 47' W Approximately 24 km south-east of High Level This lake is annotated as Devil's Lake on the survey map drawn in 1914 by P.M.H. LeBlanc, DLS. This is a translation of the Dunne-za or Beaver name, Minke Mets-li, by which Dunne-za residents refer to the lake. The suggestion from one resident that Bad Lake would be closer translation, as the lake is very dangerous during stormy weather, is an indication of the descriptive origin of the name. 4
Deville 32-51-20-W4 53° 27' N 112° 55' W Approximately 50 km east south-east of Edmonton Named after Dr. Edouard-Gaston Deville (1849-1924), the Surveyor General of Canada. Deville, as one of the first honorary members of the Alpine Club of Canada, introduced photo-topographic surveying into this country, and Arthur Wheeler pioneered its application to the mapping of the Rocky Mountains in 1895. Dr. Deville remained in charge of surveys until his death. 3
Dillon River 7-1-78-1-W4 55° 44' N 110° 00' W Flows into Saskatchewan approximately 130 km south-east of Fort McMurray A local family name submitted by J.N. Wallace, DLS, ALS, who surveyed the 4th Meridian in 1909-1910. The 4th Meridian forms the Alberta-Saskatchewan border. 4
Dinosaur Ridge 35-61-14-W6 54° 19' N 119° 59' W Approximately 77 km west north-west of Grande Cache The name for this ridge, which is 1,691 m in altitude, was proposed by R.W. Cautley on October 18, 1922 for the skyline resemblance of the ridge to the shape of a dinosaur. 1
Disaster Point 25-48-28-W5 53° 11' N 117° 58' W Approximately 38 km south-west of Hinton Dr. Edouard Deville, Surveyor General of Canada, named this point because Sir Sandford Fleming's brandy flask was broken on a rock here. CPR surveyor Fleming was exploring a possible route for the CPR in 1872 when this "disaster" occurred. 1
Divergence Peak 6-41-28-W5 52° 30' N 118° 00' W Approximately 40 km south-east of Jasper Named by A.O. Wheeler in 1921, this 2,827 m mountain peak lies at an angle on the Alberta-BC boundary. 1
Dogpound 5-29-3-W5 51° 28' N 114° 24' W Approximately 52 km north north-west of Calgary The name for this locality was first used in 1883 by a surveyor named Fawcett. Perhaps the most likely origin is its derivation from the translation given by the Cree. It refers to the dogs pounding on the banks of the creek as the Indian braves returned to winter camp after hunting food. During the winter, it is said that some tribes settled along the banks of the creek as it provided a natural roadway to the game area. 2
Donald Creek 29-90-9-W4 56° 44' N 111° 24' W Flows north-west into Athabasca River approximately 10 km north of Fort McMurray Named by S.C. Ellis for a son of C.H. Freeman, an instrument man on a survey during 1924. 4
Donna Creek 14-122-9-W6 59° 35' N 119° 25' W Flows north-west into Petitot River, approximately 127 km north of Rainbow Lake This precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown. The name was submitted by B.M. Rustad, ALS, following his 1964-1965 survey of the 31st Baseline. 4
Donnelly Island 4-108-8-W5 58° 21' N 115° 15' W In Peace River, approximately 109 km east south-east of High Level The name was applied to this island by C.P. Hotchkiss in 1920 after his first assistant, Cecil Donnelly, DLS, ALS. (1889-1966) during survey work in the area. 4
Douglas River 10-12-108-1-W4 58° 22' N 110° 01' W Flows west into Old Fort River approximately 192 km north north-east of Fort McMurray It as named after G. Douglas, the explorer with J.R. Akins, DLS, and his survey crew who were working on the 28th Baseline in 1917. 4
Doupe Bay Saskatchewan As Chief Surveyor for the western lines of the Canadian Pacific Railway, Jacob Lonsdale Doupe was a well-respected land surveyor in Canada. He surveyed hundreds of subdivisions and townsites along the CPR railway lines. The Saskatchewan Geographic Board named a bay after him in Jan Lake shown on map 63L15 at Latitude 54 degrees and 55 minutes, Longitude 102 degrees and 50 minutes. 6
Dover River 19-94-11-W4 57° 10' N 111° 45' W Flows east into MacKay River approximately 53 km north north-west of Fort McMurray The precise origin of the name of this river is unknown although it is recorded by G.H. Blanchet, DLS, by that name in 1914. The term "dover" is derived from the Welsh Gaelic word "dwfr" and means "the waters" or "the stream." 4
Doze Lake 13-125-1-W4 59° 52' N 110° 00' W Approximately 350 km north north-east of Fort McMurray The name was adopted in 1939, after J.W. Doze, ALS, an assistant on the Saskatchewan-Alberta Boundary Commission's party who surveyed the boundary from Lake Athabasca to the 60th parallel. 4
Dragon Peak 17-40-26-W5 52° 27' N 117° 43' W Approximately 55 km south-east of Jasper The descriptive name for this mountain peak, 2,940 m in altitude, was applied in 1921 by A.O. Wheeler. At the time of naming the rock shape near the summit was said to resemble a dragon. 1
Driftwood Lake 8-88-22-W5 56° 37' N 117° 27' W Approximately 35 km south south-west of Manning The name was noted in 1919 by J.A. Buchanan, DLS, ALS, and is probably descriptive of dead wood on its shores. 4
Dromore, Mount 6-46-27-W5 52° 57' N 117° 53' W Approximately 16 km north-east of Jasper This mountain was named by M.P. Bridgland in 1916 after the town of Dromore, County Down, Ireland. The word "dromore" is Gaelic for "great ridge." 1
Dryden Creek 33-97-1-W6 57° 28' N 118° 06' W Flows south into Botha River, approximately 65 km north north-west of Manning The creek was likely named after J. Dryden, a mounder in the survey crew of J.R. Akins, DLS, in 1915. 4

Eagles Nest Pass - Eva Lake

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Eagles Nest Pass 7-52-4-W6 53° 28' 30N 118° 34' 00W Approximately 75 km north north-west of Jasper CPR surveyor Walter Moberly named this pass after following the eagles through the mountains to the opening. The name became increasing well-established locally and was officially approved January 15, 1979. The elevation of the narrow mountain pass measures 2,103 m in altitude. 1
Ebon Peak 29-32-19-W5 51° 47' N 116° 38' W Approximately 100 km north-west of Banff on the Alberta-BC boundary The name for this peak, which is 2,910 m in altitude, was applied by A.O. Wheeler in 1918. An ebony-coloured line may be distinctly seen amid a line of snow-covered peaks. 1
Edith Lake 26-45-1-W6 52° 54' N 118° 02' W Approximately 4 km north north-east of Jasper H.A. McColl was a general superintendent of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway who was in charge of construction at the time of this lake's naming in 1914. H. Matheson, DLS, gave this lake its name after Edith McColl, the wife of H.A. McColl. 1
Edwards Lake 4-107-4-W4 58° 15' N 110° 37' W Approximately 170 km north north-east of Fort McMurray The name shows as early as 1919 on federal government maps and, although the origin of the name is not precisely known, it may have been named after a member of a survey crew. 4
Edwin Creek 15-89-3-W4 56° 43' N 110° 23' W Flows north-west into Clearwater River, approximately 62 km east of Fort McMurray In correspondence with the Geographic Names Board of Canada, J.N. Wallace stated it was named after Edwin Gay of Lloydminster, a survey crew member. 4
Eiffel Peak 30-27-16-W5 51° 20' N 116° 14' W Approximately 50 km west north-west of Banff The descriptive name for this mountain, 3,084 m, was officially applied to this feature in 1908 from a map of A.O. Wheeler's. There is a huge tower rising for about 305 m at the summit of the mountain, suggestive of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France. 1
Elephas Mountain 2-42-3-W6 52° 36' N 118° 20' W Approximately 36 km south-west of Jasper Named by A.O. Wheeler in 1922, this mountain is 2,940 m in altitude. Its fancied resemblance in shape to an elephant's head inspired the name, elephas, the Latin word for elephant. 1
Elliott River 11-99-1-W5 57° 34' N 114° 02' W Flows south-west in Mikkwa River approximately 185 km north-west of Fort McMurray After Lieutenant Elliott Greene, assistant on a survey party in 1913. He joined the 3rd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, during World War I. 4
Elsa Lake 33-120-4-W6 59° 28' N 118° 37' W Approximately 115 km north-east of Rainbow Lake It was named after Elsa Carter of Fawcett Alberta, on the suggestion of her husband, Cecil Carter, a member of a survey party camping at this lake in 1966. 4
Elysium Mountain 10-46-3-W6 52° 57' N 118° 22' W Approximately 20 km west north-west of Jasper In Greek mythology, elysium is the supposed state or abode of the blessed after death. This mountain, which is 2,446 m in altitude, overlooks fine meadows the sight of which alludes to "Elysian Fields." M.P. Bridgland gave this mountain is allegorically descriptive name in 1916. 1
Emerson Lakes 7-55-21-W5 53° 53' 30N 117° 07' 00W Approximately 47 km west north-west of Edson The name was first suggested for official approval by R.J. Paterson, Director of Surveys on November 25, 1968. This group of lakes was originally called "Seven Lakes" by the natives but the name Emerson had since then become locally well-established. 1
Emir Mountain 6-47-27-W5 53° 01' N 117° 55' W Approximately 51 km south-west of Hinton An emir is a Saracen or Arab prince or governor. This mountain was named in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland because of its prominence. 1
End Mountain 1-26-9-W5 51° 12' N 115° 08' W Approximately 20 km north-east of Canmore The name for this mountain, which is 2,420 m in altitude, is descriptive; it is at the "end" of the range. The name was officially approved January 16, 1912. J.J. McArthur, DLS, who surveyed along the railway belt in 1885 may have named this feature, as he named many features on the Alberta-BC boundary. 1
English Island 13-6-112-7-W4 58° 42' N 111° 11' W Approximately 210 km north of Fort McMurray in Lake Athabasca The name of this island refers to the time that Peter Fidler of the Hudson's Bay Company attempted to establish a post here called Nottingham House. 4
Epler Lake 5-109-1-W4 58° 26' N 110° 08' W Approximately 195 km north north-east of Fort McMurray The name was recorded for this lake in 1917 by J.R. Akins, DLS. 4
Erebus Mountain 19-42-2-W6 52° 38' N 118° 17' W Approximately 30 km south-west of Jasper This 3,119 m mountain was named in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. There is a dark rock precipice on the mountain which faces north-east. The Greek name for "darkness" is "erebus;" hence the name for this feature is descriptive of the north-east face of the mountain. 1
Eremite Mountain 20-42-2-W6 52° 38' N 118° 15' W Approximately 30 km south-west of Jasper The descriptive name for this 2,910 m mountain was applied in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. The remote position of this mountain reminds one of an eremite, a hermit. The other features take their names from this mountain. 1
Ermatinger, Mount 9-40-1-W6 52° 25' N 118° 02' W Approximately 51 km south of Jasper This 3,060 m mountain was named by A.O. Wheeler after Edward Ermatinger (1797-1876). Ermatinger served with the Hudson's Bay Company from 1818-1828. 1
Erris, Mount 7-11-5-W5 49° 54' N 114° 41' W Approximately 30 km north-west of Coleman on the Alberta-BC boundary Officially named by M.P. Bridgland in 1915. This 2,820 m mountain is named after Erris, a prominent headland on the west coast of Ireland in County Mayo. 1
Esmond Creek 36-125-1-W6 59° 54' N 118° 01' W Flows south south-west into Beatty Lake approximately 161 km north north-west of High Level This creek was named by J.R. Akins, DLS, during his 1915 survey of the 6th Meridian, as the name is recorded in the field notes. No further data is noted in his field correspondence on the origins of this name, and there is no record of a field crew member of this name. 4
Esplanade Mountain 25-47-2-W6 53° 05' N 118° 10' W Approximately 23 km north north-west of Jasper The descriptive name for this flat-topped ridge was applied to the mountain in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. 1
Eunice Creek 23-48-25-W5 53° 09' N 117° 14' W Flows north-west into McLeod River, approximately 72 km south-west of Edson This creek was named by a member of a survey party in 1926 and the name became incorporated on survey maps. The origin of the name is unknown. 1
Eva Lake 24-114-8-W5 58° 54' N 115° 11' W Approximately 118 km east north-east of High Level This lake is said to be for the wife of James Nevin Wallace, DLS, ALS. 4

Faria Creek - Friock Creek

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Faria Creek 3-105-1-W6 58° 05' N 118° 03' W Flows east into Chinchaga River approximately 73 km south-west of High Level It may have been named after a crew member working on the survey of the 27th Baseline or the Alberta-Saskatchewan Boundary Survey. It appears on a provincial government map of 1930. 4
Farrier Creek 8-25-70-1-W4 55° 03' N 110° 00' W Flows into Saskatchewan approximately 90 km north of Cold Lake. Officially adopted in 1950, it is referred to in the 1909 Dominion Land Survey reports. It was named after W. Farrier, a survey crew member. The word "farrier" refers to a smith whose specialty is shoeing horses. 4
Fawcett Lake 73-W4 55° 18' N 113° 53' W Approximately 55 km east of Slave Lake This lake was named for Sidney Dawson Fawcett, a Dominion Land Surveyor who surveyed the 19th Baseline in 1912. 4
Fidler Point 34-116-3-W4 59° 06' N 110° 25' W Approximately 264 km north north-east of Fort McMurray Located on the north shore of Lake Athabasca, it was officially named in 1922 in honour of Peter Fidler of the Hudson's Bay Company, a person who contributed much to the recorded history of Alberta. Fidler was born in 1769 and, in 1796, he was appointed the chief surveyor and map maker for the Hudson's Bay Company. He established Nottingham House in 1802 to rival the efforts of the North West Company at nearby Fort Chipewyan. During his career, he surveyed and mapped much of Western Canada. 4
Fifth Meridian 24-111-1-W5 58° 38' N 114° 00' W Approximately 180 km east north-east of High Level This is a descriptive name as the hamlet is situated right on the Fifth Meridian or 114° longititude. Dominion Land Surveyors established six principal meridians: the Prime or First Meridian is near Winnipeg. The Fourth Meridian, 110°, forms the border between Alberta and Saskatchewan. 4
Filion Creek 20-100-19-W4 57° 42' N 113° 05' W Flows south into Birch River approximately 148 km north-west of Fort McMurray The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown; it was referred to by F.V. Seibert, DLS, ALS, in 1914. 4
Fleming Lake 34-112-9-W5 58° 46' N 115° 26' W Approximately 110 km east north-east of High Level It was named by J.R. Akins, DLS during his 1914 survey after his chainman, Harold N. Fleming of Grenfell, Saskatchewan. 4
Fletcher Channel 10-29-111-6-W4 58° 40' N 110° 58' W Flows north into Lake Athabasca approximately 207 km north of Fort McMurray It was named in 1917 after J.A. Fletcher, DLS. 4
Fletcher Lake NW-32-116-5-W4 59° 07' N 110° 49' W Approximately 260 km north of Fort McMurray Officially named in 1962 after J.A. Fletcher, DLS, who in 1916, surveyed the area and the 30th Baseline which runs through the lake. 4
Flood Lake 36-86-25-W5 56° 30' N 117° 48' W Approximately 36 km north north-west of Grimshaw The name was recorded as early as 1913 by G.A. Tipper, DLS, ALS, and it suggests a tendency of the lake to overflow. 4
Flume Creek 18-62-13-W6 54° 22' N 119° 57' W Flows south-east into Narraway River, approximately 63 km north-west of Grande Cache The descriptive name for this creek was proposed October 18 1922 by R.W. Cautley, ALS, due to the steep gradient and outbanks on both sides of the stream. A flume is defined as an "artificial channel conveying water etc, for industrial use; ravine with stream." 1
Flyingcamp Lake 8-67-15-W4 54° 47' 00” N 112° 15' 30” W Approximately 19 km west of Lac La Biche The name for this lake appeared on a township map dated 1922 and was officially approved in January 1948. Its precise origin is not clear but it may have been near a fishing or survey camp base. 3
Formby Lake 2-81-1-W4 56° 15' N 110° 02' W Approximately 97 km south-east of Fort McMurray This lake, on the Alberta-Saskatchewan boundary, was named after a suburb of Liverpool, England, by H. Parry, DLS, Formby means "old-fashioned" or "farmland of a man called Forni." 4
Fort Saskatchewan 33-54-22-W4 53° 42' 54” N 113° 11' 42” W Approximately 35 km north-east of Edmonton Fort Saskatchewan was established in 1875 by Inspector W.O. Jarvis as the first NWMP post in the region. The citizens of Edmonton complained that the post was not built nearer Edmonton but surveys for a railroad through the Yellowhead Pass crossed the river at that point and the site was considered suitable for transport purposes. 3
Fortalice Mountain 15-44-2-W6 52° 47' N 118° 13' W Approximately 13 km south-west of Jasper This outlying peak, which is 2,835 m in altitude, has a descriptive name, since it resembles a small fort. It was named by M.P. Bridgland in 1916. 1
Foulwater Creek 23-103-13-W6 57° 56' N 120° 00' W Flows north-west into British Columbia approximately 75 km south south-west of Rainbow Lake Named by an Alberta-British Columbia Boundary Commission survey party as a result of illness attributed to impurities in the water. 4
Fourth Creek 30-81-6-W6 56° 03' N 118° 56' W Flows east into Peace River approximately 33 km east of Fairview The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown; it is likely one of a series of creeks recorded by surveyors, who gave them numbers in order to differentiate one from the othe. It was only this one whose name survived. 4
Fox Creek 30-79-1-W6 55° 51' N 118° 09' W Flows west into Saddle (Burnt) River approximately 65 km south-west of Peace River The name was mentioned as early as 1901 in the field notes of the Dominion Land Surveyor working in the area. It is descriptive of the animal found in the area. The Town of Fox Creek takes its name from the creek. 4
Francis Peak 58-13-W6 53° 03' 20” N 119° 56' 10” W Approximately 63 km west north-west of Grande Cache This 2,406 m mountain peak was named February 6, 1926 after Private Francis Loren May. Private May was killed in action at the Third Battle of Ypres on June 3, 1916. Previous to the war, Private May was employed as a member of the Topographical Survey Party under the direction of George McMillan, DLS. The mountain on which the two peaks, George and Francis, are situated commemorates the two brothers killed in the First World War. The names were suggested by their uncle, V. Ernest May, Chief Map Draftsman Topographical Survey, May 20, 1925. 1
Frank Lake SE-4-80-19-W5 55° 54' N 116° 54' W Approximately 20 km north of McLennan The name appears as early as 1914 when the Dominion Land Surveyors were in the area. It is not known after whom the lake is named. 4
Freeman Creek 26-64-10-W5 54° 34' N 115° 25' W Flows south-east into Freeman River approximately 5 km south-west of Swan Hills According to one version, when the Dominion Land Surveyors were in the area in the mid-teens they recorded the name of the creek, river and lakes as "Freeman," which leads to a likely explanation of the origin of the name. It referred to those former employees of fur companies who elected to remain in the interior as free hunters or free trappers. It may be the area was being trapped by these freemen. 4
Freeman River 35-61-6-W5 54° 19' N 114° 47' W Flows south-east into Athabasca River approximately 32 km north-west of Barrhead In 1906, Mr. Driscoll, DLS, stated it was known locally as Sa-kwa-ta-mau River which apparently translates from the Cree as "large sparrow hawk." 4
French, Mount 27-20-10-W5 50° 44' N 115° 18' W Approximately 70 km west north-west of Turner Valley John Denton Pinkstone French (1852-1925) who during the first 16 months of the First World War served as field marshall in command of the British Forces on the Western Front. This 3,234 m mountain was named after J.D.P. French by M.P. Bridgland in 1915. 1
Frezie Lake 32-108-6-W4 58° 26' N 110° 57' W Approximately 182 km north of Fort McMurray It was named after Joseph Frezie, an axeman in the J.R. Akins survey team in the area in 1917. 4
Friock Creek 1-97-1-W6 57° 23' 30” N 118° 00' 15” W Flows west into Botha River approximately 57 km north north-west of Manning W. Friock was an axeman on the crew of H.S. Day, DLS, ALS, working in the area in 1913. 4

Garden River - Gummer Lake

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Garden River 10-1-112-24-W4 58° 42' N 113° 54' W Flows east into Peace River approximately 184 km east of High Level Garden River was the name recorded by the surveyors in 1910. The name has since been rescinded. 4
Garfield Lake 23-85-23-W5 56° 23' N 117° 31' W Approximately 22 km north-west of Grimshaw The precise origin for the name of this lake is unknown; it is mentioned in the 1913 field notes of G.A. Tipper, DLS, ALS. 4
Gargoyle Mountain 36-47-2-W6 53° 06' N 118° 10' W Approximately 26 km north north-west of Jasper A gargoyle is described as a "grotesque spout, usually in the form of a human animal mouth, head or body, projecting from a gutter." A stream flows from the base of this mountain, 2,963 m in altitude, as from a gargoyle. The descriptive name for this feature was given by M.P. Bridgland in 1916. 1
Garner Island Saskatchewan Named after Albert Coleman Garner, ALS, a veteran of the Boer War and World War I. He was the Chief Surveyor for the Saskatchewan Land Titles Office from 1912 to 1914 and a life member of the Saskatchewan Land Surveyors' Association. Garner Island is on map sheet 74N8 on Lake Athabasca at Latitude 59 degrees and 27 minutes, Longitude 108 degrees and 12 minutes. 6
George Creek 1-42-19-W5 52° 36' N 116° 36' W Flows north into Blackstone River, approximately 38 km west north-west of Nordegg The name for this creek was proposed by H.L. Seymour, DLS, ALS in 1907 and was officially approved November 4, 1910. It commemorates George Bernstein (1857-1924), a German book and newspaper publisher. He was president of the German Development Company on Blackstone River. 1
Gerard Creek 12-98-1-W6 57° 23' N 118° 02' W Flows south into Botha River approximately 57 km north north-west of Manning The feature appears named on a federal government map of 1916 and is likely named after a member of the 1915 survey crew of J.R. Akins, DLS, working in the area. 4
Gipsy Lake 34-85-2-W4 56° 25' N 110° 14' W Approximately 76 km east south-east of Fort McMurray The precise origin of the name of this lake is unknown. The name Gipsy Lake was recorded as early as 1910 by J.N. Wallace, DLS, ALS. 4
Giroux Lake 9-65-20-W5 54° 37' N 116° 58' W Approximately 24 km north-west of Fox Creek The name appears on federal government maps as early as 1917. It may have been named after someone in the Giroux family, pioneers in the Peace River country. Because the lake is just three kilometres north of the 17th Baseline, it was likely named after a survey crew member. 4
Glendowan, Mount 34-2-1-W5 49° 11' N 114° 03' W Approximately 17 km north-west of Waterton Park This mountain was named by M.P. Bridgland in 1915. Mount Glendowan rises 2,673 m above sea level and is the namesake of the range in Ireland in the county of Donegal of the same name. Glendowan means "deep glen." 1
Gloria Lake 16-22-12-W5 50° 51' N 115° 36' W Approximately 100 km west of Calgary This lake was named by A.O. Wheeler for its magnificent colour in 1917. 1
Glover Lake 2-15-75-9-W4 55° 30' N 111° 18' W Approximately 90 km north north-east of Lac La Biche It was named after A.E. Glover, DLS, ALS, working in the area in 1918. 4
Golden Eagle Peak 21-33-21-W5 51° 51' N 116° 56' W Approximately 120 km north-west of Banff This mountain peak, 3,048 m in altitude, was named in 1919 by A.O. Wheeler. There were, at the time of naming, a number of Golden Eagles seen in the vicinity of the peak. 1
Goldsmith Creek 9-68-12-W5 54° 54' N 115° 47' W Flows north-west into Driftpile River, approximately 31 km north-west of Swan Hills It was officially named in 1906 after Sandy Goldsmith of Edmonton, a member of a survey party. 4
Goodwin Lake 20-74-11-W4 55° 26' N 111° 39' W Approximately 75 km north of Lac La Biche Possibly named after Frank Goodwin, the chief packer on the 1912 party surveying the 19th Baseline, 15 kilometres south of the lake. 4
Gordon Creek 27-90-1-W4 56° 50' N 110° 03' W Flows south into Sutton Creek, approximately 83 km east of Fort McMurray In correspondence with the Geographic Board of Canada, J.N. Wallace, DLS, ALS, said he named the feature after Gordon Sutton, a survey party member. 4
Gorman, Mount 60-14-W6 54° 11' N 120° 00' W Approximately 65 km north-west of Grande Cache on the Alberta-BC boundary The mountain, which is 2,340 m in altitude, was named in 1925 after A.O. Gorman of the Dominion Land Survey. Gorman was employed on both subdivision resurveys and baseline surveys. During the mines and technical surveys of the Alberta-BC boundary surveys, he was Assistant Surveyor General and also was Chief of the Legal Surveys Division in the early 1900s. 1
Graham Creek (Cowper Lake) 4-9-80-1-W4 55° 54' N 110° 07' W Flows west into Landels River approximately 120 km south-east of Fort McMurray This creek was named after Graham Davies of Lloydminster, a member of a survey party. The name was recorded in the 1910 notes of J.N. Wallace, DLS, ALS. 4
Graham Creek (Rio Grande) SW-25-71-13-W6 55° 10' N 119° 52' W Flows east into Windsor Creek approximately 68 km west of Grande Prairie It appears on a boundary survey map of 1922 and may be named after a survey crew member working in the area in the mid-1910s 4
Grassy Mountain 1-9-4-W5 49° 42' N 114° 25' W Approximately 12 km north of Blairmore M.P. Bridgland suggested the descriptive name of Grassy Mountain for this feature, which 2,065 m in altitude. The name was officially approved in July 1915 but the mountain has since been exploited for coal and its name is no longer as appropriate as it once was. 1
Grassy Ridge 48-2-W6 53° 07' N 118° 10' W Approximately 26 km north north-west of Jasper This descriptive name was officially applied to this ridge in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. The ridge has a grassy shoulder on it. 1
Greenock, Mount 4-48-1-W6 53° 06' N 118° 05' W Approximately 25 km north of Jasper Named in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland, this mountain which is 2,065 m in altitude has a rounded peak. "Greenroch" means "the sunny knoll" in Gaelic so perhaps the mountain was climbed on a sunny day. Greenock is also a town in Scotland. 1
Gregg Lake 32-52-26-W5 53° 32' N 117° 48' W Approximately 21 km north-west of Hinton Mr. John James Gregg (1840-1941) lived in the district for 18 years and was the first person to tell the surveyor Saint-Cyr, who named the lake in 1908, about its location. 1
Grisette Mountain 12-46-28-W5 52° 56' N 117° 57' W Approximately 12 km north-east of Jasper Gris is the French word for "grey." This mountain was named by M.P. Bridgland in 1916 due to its composition of greyish limestone. 1
Gross Creek 10-8-105-4-W4 58° 06' N 110° 37' W Flows south-west into Maybelle River approximately 150 km north north-east of Fort McMurray The name appears on maps as early as 1919, and although the origin of the name is not precisely known, it may have been the surname of a survey crew member working for F.V. Seibert, DLS, ALS, in 1915. 4
Gull Lake 5-109-13-W5 58° 26' N 116° 07' W Approximately 58 km east of High Level A descriptive name due to the large number of gulls found there. This name was apparently in use at the turn of the century as it was recorded by A.W. Ponton during the 1910 Dominion Survey of 108-13-W5. J.B. St. Cyr, DLS, during the survey of the North Vermilion settlement, recorded the stream draining this lake as Gull Creek. 4
Gummer Lake 34-73-7-W6 55° 22' N 119° 00' W Approximately 21 km north-west of Grande Prairie Although not officially named until the 1950s, the name for this lake probably refers to Ed and Eva Gummer who homesteaded on land nearby. Mr. Gummer was born in 1889 in Norham, Ontario. He moved to the Peace River country in 1912 and filed for land about 15 km west of Sexsmith. In the early years, he worked on the Dominion Lands Survey as a chainman. 4

Hamelin Creek - Hunting Creek

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Hamelin Creek 16-81-6-W6 56° 02' 20” N 118° 52' 30” W Flows east north-east into Peace River approximately 30 km south-east of Fairview It first shows on federal government maps as early as 1918 and is likely named after a survey crew member. 4
Hangingstone River 10-89-9-W4 56° 43' N 111° 20' W Flows north into Clearwater River, at Fort McMurray This descriptive name, noted by A.J. Tremblay, DLS, ALS during his survey in 1912, comes from a big rock that hung out over the edge of the river bank. On hot days, the oil sands used to seep through fissures in the rock. 4
Hanmore Lake 30-61-W4 54° 17' N 112° 31' W Approximately 21 km north of Smoky Lake The name for this lake has been official since at least 1958 and apparently commemorates a survey party or parties unknown in the Lac La Biche district. 3
Harper Creek (DeBolt) 15-14-71-1-W6 55° 08' N 118° 02' W Flows south-west into Cornwall Creek, approximately 45 km east of Grande Prairie The local people remember Danny Harper who operated a stopping place along the creek at approximately 1-71-1-W6. He may have been a member of the survey crew although his name was not mentioned in any of the extant Dominion Land Surveys records of the time. 4
Harper Creek (Edra Creek) SW-32-106-24-W4 58° 14' N 113° 56' W Flows east into Birch River approximately 189 km east of High Level It has appeared on federal government maps as early as 1916 and was named after C.H. Harper, DLS, a leveller on the survey crew of T.H. Plunkett, DLS. 4
Harris, Mount 33-32-16-W5 51° 47' N 116° 13' W Approximately 80 km north-west of Banff This mountain, which is 3,299 m in altitude, was named after L.E. Harris, ALS. In 1919, he was the first person to climb the mountain. 1
Harrison River 10-36-110-21-W4 58° 41' N 110° 21' W Flows west into Old Fort Bay approximately 218 km north north-east of Fort McMurray It appears on maps as early as 1919. According to the files of the Geographic Board of Canada, it was named after J.B. McFarlane, DLS, ALS, after his friend, Mr. Harrison from Toronto, who was interested in hunting and exploration. 4
Hawk Mountain 26-46-1-W6 53° 01' N 118° 01' W Approximately 16 km north of Jasper A hawk was seen flying about the summit of this 2,553 m mountain at the time of its naming in 1916. The name was officially applied by M.P. Bridgland. 1
Helen Lake 18-87-24-W5 56° 32' N 117° 49' W Approximately 41 km north north-west of Grimshaw After whom this is named is not known; the name first appears in the notes of G.A. Tipper, DLS, in 1913. The lake may also have been known as Slimson Lake before that. 4
Henderson Creek 15-115-23-W5 59° 00' N 117° 50' W Flows north north-east into Hay River approximately 66 km north-west of High Level Named by J.R. Akins, DLS, during the 1914 survey season. It was named after Francis Dillon Henderson also a surveyor, who at the time this was named was Secretary of the Board of Examiners for the Dominion Land Surveyors. 4
Hibernia Lake 7-45-1-W6 52° 52' N 118° 08' W Approximately 3 km west of Jasper Hibernia is the Latin name for Ireland. The lake was named in 1914 by H. Matheson of the Dominion Land Survey. Its waters are reputed to have a paddy-green colour. 1
Hiding Creek 36-67-14-W6 54° 50' N 120° 00' W Flows west into British Columbia approximately 82 km south-west of Grande Prairie Recorded by the Alberta-British Columbia Boundary Commission in 1924, the name is descriptive of its location for it traverses very difficult country and at one time provided a safe haven for moose. 4
Hilda Lake 22-110-11-W4 58° 34' N 111° 45' W Approximately 196 km north of Fort McMurray The name is found on maps as early as 1919 and is likely named after a relative of a survey crew member. 4
Hines Creek 13-7-80-4-W6 55° 55' N 118° 37' W Flows south into Peace River approximately 20 km north-east of Spirit River Possibly named after an Anglican missionary who, according to Crockford's Clerical Dictionary, served at Sandy Lake Mission in what was then known as the North-West Territories. He was there for the years 1875-1888. The surveyor is the area in 1908 recorded it as Muddy Creek. In 1912, G.A. Tipper referred to it as Hines Creek but also noted it was at one time called Island Creek. 4
Hoffman, Mount 18-19-5-W5 50° 36' N 114° 37' W Approximately 28 km west of Turner Valley This mountain, which is 1,829 m in altitude, was named by A.O. Wheeler in 1896 after a member of his survey party. Mr. Hoffman subsequently became a hotel proprietor in Olds. The name was made official September 6, 1951. 1
Hollies Creek 30-88-6-W4 56° 40' N 110° 57' W Flows south-west into Clearwater River, approximately 28 km east south-east of Fort McMurray Named in 1925 for R.T. Hollies, an instrument man on a survey in the area in 1914-1915. 4
Horse River 17-89-9-W4 56° 43' N 111° 23' W Flows north-east into Athabasca River at Fort McMurray The origin of the name Horse River is unclear. It has been suggested that the river received its name because a horse fell through ice into the river, or because packhorses were able to ford this river in two places. A.J. Tremblay, DLS, ALS, referred to it as Horse Creek in 1912. 4
Horseshoe Ridge 16-13-3-W5 50° 05' N 114° 20' W Approximately 55 km west of Claresholm Named by M.P. Bridgland on June 30, 1915, this ridge measures 2,131 m in altitude. Its name is descriptive of the sweeping curve in the ridge which faces north-east. 1
Hotchkiss 26-93-23-W5 57° 06' N 117° 34' W Approximately 19 km north of Manning The station, hamlet and river were all named in 1915 in honour of C.P. Hotchkiss, DLS, who worked with J.R. Akins on the survey of the 93rd township in 1915-1916. 4
House Mountain 10-70-11-W5 55° 03' N 115° 36' W Approximately 60 km west south-west of the town of Slave Lake According to J.N. Wallace, in correspondence to the Geographic Board of Canada, it is a "translation of Waskahigan Watchee, so called from the resemblance of its profile to the roof of a house which is very marked from a certain direction." Waskahigan is the Cree word for house or lodge. 4
Hunting Creek 8-4-79-23-W5 55° 49' N 117° 32' W Flows north-west into Smoky River approximately 40 km west north-west of McLennan The name was recorded by a surveyor in 1909. The origin of the name is not known; however, it may be descriptive of activities carried on near the watercourse. When it was being surveyed, a portion of it was labelled as Racing Creek. 4

Inkster Lake - Joslyn Creek

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Inkster Lake NE-36-125-1-W4 59° 55' N 110° 01' W Approximately 353 km north north-east of Fort McMurray on the Alberta-Saskatchewan boundary Records indicate that the name was included in a list of additional names dated November 28, 1938 after the members of the Saskatchewan-Alberta Boundary Commission and the survey party who made the survey of the boundary from Lake Athabasca to the 60th Parallel. The lake was named after Oluff Inkster, the assistant on the survey. 4
Intersection Mountain 3-56-14-W6 53° 48' N 120° 00' W Approximately 58 km west south-west of Grande Cache, on the Alberta-BC boundary The name for this 2,452 m mountain was chosen in preference to "Mount Haig" to avoid duplication. The mountain is located at the intersection of the Continental Divide with the 120th Meridian. Intersection Mountain was the name suggested by R.W. Cautley and this name was officially applied to the feature in 1925. 1
Iroquois Creek 14-75-17-W5 55° 29' N 116° 32' W Flows north-east into West Prairie River, approximately 8 km west of High Prairie In his field notes of 1911, Arthur St. Cyr records "nat-sho-e or Iroquois Creek." 4
Island Creek 18-81-4-W6 56° 01' N 118° 37' W Flows south into Hines Creek approximately 15 km south-west of Fairview The name is likely descriptive of the feature and was noted by J.B. St. Cyr, DLS, in 1908. 4
Island Lake 34-89-21-W4 56° 46' 55” N 113° 15' 40” W Approximately 124 km west of Fort McMurray A descriptive name, because of the small island in the centre of the lake. It was recorded by G.H. Blanchet, DLS, in 1912. 4
Jack Creek 23-83-5-W6 56° 12' N 118° 41' W Flows south south-west into Hines Creek approximately 24 km north-west of Fairview The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown. It appears on a map by G.A. Tipper, DLS, ALS, as a result of his 1912 survey. 4
Jarvis Creek 1-54-26-W5 53° 38' N 117° 42' W Flows north into Wildhay River, approximately 27 km north north-west of Hinton Edward William Jarvis and CF Hanington conducted a study of the CPR survey route during the winter of 1874-1875. Jarvis joined the NWMP as superintendent after his long arduous survey of the area from Fort George to the Athabasca River. The name for this creek was suggested by a local surveyor, Saint Cyr, in 1908, after E.W. Jarvis. 1
Jean Cote 36-79-22-W5 55° 54' N 117° 19' W Approximately 20 km north north-west of Falher Named after Senator Jean Leon Cote, DLS, ALS. 4
Jellett Way North of Jackson Road, west of Jefferson Road, Edmonton Born in Canada West in 1859, St. George Jellett came west with a survey party. After a few years of farming at Clover Bar, Jellett moved to Edmonton where he worked as an insurance agent. He was the secretary-treasurer of the Edmonton District Telephone Company and the Edmonton Electric Light Company. 5
Jessie, Mount 12-50-10-W6 53° 18' N 119° 20' W Approximately 95 km west north-west of Jasper This mountain, which is 2,652 m in altitude, was named in 1925 after Miss Jessie Campbell. She was the sister of A.J. Campbell, DLS, ALS. 1
Johnson Lake SE-14-124-1-W4 59° 46' N 110° 03' W Approximately 338 km north north-east of Fort McMurray This was named after P.N. Johnson, a Director of Surveys in Alberta. 4
Joslyn Creek 34-95-11-W4 57° 17' N 111° 42' W Flows south-east into Ellis River approximately 65 km north north-west of Fort McMurray It was named by G.H. Blanchet, DLS, during his survey in 1914; the origin is unknown. 4

Kakut Lake - Lucerne Peak

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Kakut Lake 34-76-4-W6 55° 37' N 118° 32' W Approximately 25 km south-east of Spirit River This name is possibly Beaver or Cree in origin and has been translated to mean "Mud Lake." The name was recorded when J.H. Smith, DLS, ALS surveyed the area in 1911. 4
Kakwa River 64-4-W6 54° 37' N 118° 27' W Flows north-east into Smoky River approximately 140 km Wsouth-east of Grande Prairie Kakwa is the Cree word for porcupine, and it is the name Porcupine River that was recorded by the Dominion Land Surveyors when they were through the area around 1910. By 1924, the Cree name was applied to the river. 4
Kane, Mount 12-40-2-W6 52° 26' N 118° 08' W Approximately 49 km south of Jasper This 3,090 m mountain was named in 1921 by A.O. Wheeler after Paul Kane (1810-1871). Kane was the most famous of all Canadian artist-explorers. One of his works is called "The Surveyor." 1
Kataka Mountain 32-44-3-W6 52° 50' N 118° 23' W Approximately 22 km west south-west of Jasper The name for this 2,621 m mountain is the Indian word for "fort." The flat-topped mountain resembles a fort and was given its descriptive name in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. 1
Katrine Lake 33-45-1-W6 52° 55' N 118° 04' W Approximately 5 km north of Jasper H. Matheson of the Dominion Land Survey named this lake in 1914. The origin of the name is unknown. 1
Keane Creek 5-2-109-6-W4 58° 26' N 110° 54' W Flows north-west into Athabasca River approximately 182 km north of Fort McMurray It was named after Jason Keane, an explorer who accompanied J.R. Akins during the survey of this area in 1917. 4
Kentigern, Mount 32-17-W5 51° 47' N 116° 20' W Approximately 85 km north-west of Banff This 3,176 m mountain was named by R.W. Cautley in 1928 after St. Kentigern, who lived in the sixth century. This mountain peak marks the park boundary at a point dividing the Clearwater and Siffleur rivers. The name "Kentigern" was thought by Cautley to be "euphonious and striking." 1
Kishinena Peak 2-2-W5 49° 07' N 114° 09' W Approximately 18 km north-west of Waterton Park, on the Alberta-BC boundary The name Kishinena may be a corruption of the Indian word, "ish-nee-nee," which means "there it is." Evidently, the survey party was looking for water, and the Kootenays who crossed the summit with them answered saying "ish-nee-nee," and because they speak with a gutteral sound, the survey party did not catch the proper pronuniciation. 1
La Creche Mountain 2-58-19-W6 53° 59' N 119° 58' W Approximately 57 km west north-west of Grande Cache This name was suggested for this 2,314 m mountain because it had been adopted as a cradle or nursery by mountain goats when R.W. Cautley was surveying in the area in 1925. Its precipitous easterly face provided an excellent setting for climbing practice for young goats. 1
Lafond Creek 17-93-7-W5 57° 03' N 115° 05' W Flows east south-east into Loon River approximately 155 km east north-east of Manning It was likely named after Joe Lafond, a packer for many survey crews who worked in this area. It appears on a map as early as 1915. 4
Lalby Creek 15-20-78-22-W5 55° 47' N 117° 22' W Flows south-west into Hunting Creek approximately 12 km west north-west of Falher The surveyor first in the area was H.W. Selby, and whether there is any connection with the last three letters of his name and the name of the creek is not known. It shows as early as 1914 on the federal government maps. 4
Larne Creek 8-119-23-W5 59° 19' N 117° 54' W Flows south-east into Steen River, approximately 102 km north north-west of High Level The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown. It may be after Larne County, Antrim, Northern Ireland. It was first noted by J.R. Akins, during his survey of September 1915. 4
Larocque Creek 7-105-5-W4 58° 06' N 110° 49' W Approximately 148 km north of Fort McMurray The lake was named after E. Larocque, an axeman for F.V. Seibert, DLS, ALS, who surveyed in this area as early as 1915. 4
Latornell River 14-69-27-W5 54° 58' N 118° 00' W Flows east into Simonette River approximately 55 km east south-east of Grande Prairie Originally known as Moose River, the name was changed around 1920 to honour Lt-Col A.J. Latornell, DLS, ALS, killed in WWI. 4
Lawrence River 24-108-7-W5 58° 23' N 115° 01' W Flows south-east into Peace River approximately 123 km south-east of High Level The name of this river derives from the influential Lawrence family who lived in northern Alberta. The name was first applied to the stream by C.P. Hotchkiss, DLS, in 1920. In 1914, the name for the stream was recorded as Horse Creek. Horse Creek is now locally known as the next stream to the east. 4
Leather Peak 18-45-5-W6 52° 52' N 118° 36' W Approximately 35 km west of Jasper The name for this 2,286 m mountain peak commemorates a disused name of the Yellowhead Pass. It was applied by A.O. Wheeler in 1918, and refers to the supplies for trading posts, such as moose or caribou skins, carried by fur traders through the nearby pass. 1
Legend Lake 7-97-18-W4 57° 24' N 112° 55' W Approximately 118 km north-west of Fort McMurray The precise origin of the name of this lake is unknown. It was recorded as early as 1914 by G.H. Blanchet, DLS. According to the files of the Geographic Board of Canada, it was named for the Chipewyan legend that said the lake sometimes swallowed canoes. 4
Lendrum Place 51 Avenue to 61 Avenue, 111 Street to 115 Street, Edmonton Irish-born Robert Watt Lendrum (1834-1912) immigrated to Canada West in 1850 and went on to become an Alberta Land Surveyor. Lendrum came to south Edmonton in 1892 as a Dominion Land Surveyor and latter settled on a homestead in the Rabbit Hill area. The property that he once owned now makes up the Lendrum Place neighbourhood while the lake on this site was known as Lendrum Lake. 5
Levellers Creek 25-103-13-W6 57° 58' N 120° 00' W Flows south-west into British Columbia approximately 70 km south south-west of Rainbow Lake The name Levellers Creek was recorded by the Alberta-British Columbia Boundary Survey of 1951-1952, due to an accident that resulted in the levellers of the party getting dunked. 4
Lick Peak 14-40-28-W5 52° 27' N 117° 55' W Approximately 50 km south south-east of Jasper on the Alberta-BC boundary This 2,877 m peak was named in 1921 by A.O. Wheeler. There was a salt deposit, known as a "lick," near the nearby creek where wild animals gathered to obtain salt. 1
Lily Lake 34-54-5-W5 53° 42' N 114° 39' W Approximately 42km south-east of Mayerthorpe The name for this lake was likely applied by surveyors, as it appears on a map produced by the Surveys and Mapping Branch, dated 1953. Its precise origin is unknown. 3
Limon Lake 31-108-8-W4 58° 26' N 111° 20' W Approximately 180 km north of Fort McMurray This descriptive name was noted as early as 1917 by J.R. Akins, DLS, Limon is the French translation of its earlier name, Mud Lake. 4
Line Lake 34-100-3-W4 57° 44' N 110° 24' W Approximately 128 km north-east of Fort McMurray This is a descriptive name as the lake is situated on the 26th Baseline. It was apparently called Reid Lake until it was officially named Line Lake. 4
Lobstick River 33-53-9-W5 53° 37' N 115° 17' W Flows east into Chip Lake, approximately 42 km south-west of Mayerthorpe In 1862, the river was known to the Overlanders as "Buffalo-Dung River." The Overlanders were a group of men who travelled from eastern Canada to the Cariboo Gold Rush in 1862. The name Lobstick River was submitted for approval to the Canadian Geographic Board by A.O. Wheeler on February 1, 1911. 3
Logan Lake 70-9-W4 55° 05' N 111° 23' W Approximately 52 km north-east of Lac La Biche The name has been on the maps since at least 1918 and was likely named after the Dominion Land Surveyor Bob Logan. (See Logan River) 4
Logan River 15-13-71-12-W4 55° 09' N 111° 42' W Flows south-east into Owl River approximately 45 km north north-east of Lac La Biche A native of Nova Scotia, Robert Archibald Logan decided to follow in the footsteps of his grandfather, a land surveyor in that province. After a number of years of apprenticeship working on survey crews in the Canadian West, he received his commission as a Dominion Land Surveyor in 1914. Shortly after this, he enlisted and served in the Royal Flying Corps until being taken prisoner of war in 1917. After the war, he returned to Canada. In 1922, he was the pilot on a government mission to establish police posts in the North and, while there, explored the area. His subsequent career was devoted to promoting the use of aerial photography for surveying. He was an authority on the Cree language and published a dictionary on the subject. 4
Lonebutte 32-27-15-W4 51° 21' N 112° 09' W Approximately 45 km south-east of Drumheller It is located in a fairly level strip of country between the Hand Hills and the Red Deer River. The early ranchers and cowboys who arrived before this part of the country was surveyed likely used this conspicuous butte as a landmark. 2
Long Lake 26-107-7-W4 57° 58' 00” N 111° 01' 55” W Approximately 140 km north north-east of Fort McMurray This is a descriptive name first recorded by the surveyors in the area in 1905. 4
Louis, Mount 12-26-13-W5 51° 13' N 115° 41' W Approximately 9 km south-west of Banff Louis B. Stewart, DLS, DTS (1861-1937), after whom this 2,682 m mountain was named, was a profesor of surveying at the University of Toronto. He surveyed Banff National Park with his father, G.A. Stewart, the first Park Superintendent, in 1904. 1
Low, Mount 32-20-W5 51° 43' N 116° 48' W Approximately 90 km north-west of Banff This 2,722 m mountain was named in 1920 after A.P. Low (1861-1942). The former Arctic explorer (1903-1904) and director of the Dominion Survey (1906-1908) was, at the time of naming, Deputy Minister of the Department of Mines. 1
Lower Rowe Lake 22-1-1-W5 49° 03' N 114° 03' W Approximately 10 km west of Waterton Park The lake may be found on the north face of Mount Rowe, which was named after Lieutenant Rowe, a surveyor on the British Boundary Commission of 1872-1876. 1
Lucerne Peak 18-45-5-W6 52° 52' N 118° 34' W Approximately 34 km west of Jasper This mountain peak overlooks Lucerne Railway Station and was named after Lucerne Lake and Canton in Switzerland. It was named in 1918 by A.O. Wheeler. 1

Maccarib, Mount - Murray Island

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Maccarib, Mount 43-2-W6 52° 42' N 118° 12' W Approximately 21 km south-west of Jasper This mountain, which is 2,749 m in altitude, was officially named in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. Caribou were seen below the peak and since maccarib is the Quinnipac Indian word for caribou, the mountain received this name. 1
MacGillivray Ridge 8-4-W5 49° 41' N 114° 31' W Approximately 7 km north of Coleman The name McGillivray Ridge was submitted by A.O. Wheeler in October 1921 and it was officially approved December 6, 1921. This ridge is part of the Crowsnest volcanics, and was named after a contractor in the area. 1
Magrath 26-5-22-W4 49° 25' N 112° 52' W Approximately 30 km south of Lethbridge. This town was named in 1899 for Charles A. Magrath (1860-1949) 2
Majestic Mountain 3-44-2-W6 52° 45' N 118° 13' W Approximately 16 km south-west of Jasper This mountain, which stands 3,086 m in altitude, is the highest peak in its range. The descriptive name was applied in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. 1
Makwa Ridge 47-27-W5 53° 03' N 117° 47' W Approximately 45 km south south-west of Hinton The intended name for this ridge was "muskwa," the Cree Indian word for a bear. However, it became "makwa," the Cree Indian word for "loon." It was named by M.P. Bridgland in 1916. 1
Malcolm MacCrimmon Park 10403 29A Avenue, Edmonton Malcolm MacCrimmon (1851-1928) was a railway builder who helped construct the first rail lines in western Canada. He was born in Ontario and left home at the age of 21 to work for the International Boundary Survey in Manitoba. In 1901, the MacCrimmon family moved to Edmonton where housing shortages forced them to spend their first winter in a tent. The park was named after him in 1985. 5
Mallard Peak 22-40-2-W6 52° 27' N 118° 12' W Approximately 47 km south south-west of Jasper This mountain peak, which is 2,835 m in altitude, was given its descriptive name in 1921 by A.O. Wheeler. The shape of the rock resembles a mallard duck. 1
Manx Peak 11-44-2-W6 52° 47' N 118° 12' W Approximately 13 km south-west of Jasper The shape of the contours of this 3,044 m mountain peak resembles the coat of arms of the Isle of Man. The name was applied in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. 1
Margaret Lake 3-115-9-W5 58° 57' N 115° 25' W Approximately 112 km east north-east of High Level It was named by J.R. Akins, DLS, in 1914 after his first wife Margaret (Grass) Akins. 4
Marguerite River 16-99-7-W4 57° 36' N 111° 06' W Flows south-west into Firebag River, approximately 99 km north north-east of Fort McMurray This river is named after Marguerite, sister of F.V. Seibert, DLS, ALS. 4
Marion Lake 24-37-18-W4 52° 13' N 112° 26' W Approximately 24 km south-east of Stettler According to local residents, this lake was likely named before pioneer settlement (pre 1900) although it was not officially recognized until after 1928, and thus was possibly named by an early survey party; however, its precise origin is unknown. 3
Marjorie Lake 7-45-1-W6 52° 52' N 118° 07' W Approximately 2 km west of Jasper The name for this lake was applied by H. Matheson, DLS in 1914. The origin of the name is unknown. 1
Marlow Creek 1-125-1-W6 59° 50' N 118° 02' W Flows west north-west into Beatty Lake approximately 154 km north north-west of High Level Named by J.R. Akins, DLS, during his 1915 survey of the 6th Meridian. His field correspondence gives no clues as to the identity of Marlow. 4
Mastadon Mountain 11-42-3-W6 52° 36' N 118° 20' W Approximately 35 km south-west of Jasper This mountain, which is 2,987 m in altitude, has a fancied resemblance in shape to the extinct mammal which was a type of elephant. It was given its descriptive name in 1922 by A.O. Wheeler. 1
May Hill NW-3-76-16-W4 55° 34' N 112° 24' W Approximately 70 km west north-west of Lac La Biche The name for the hill was officially adopted in 1973 after a suggestion from the Alberta Surveys Branch. This hill took its name from the forestry lookout tower on the hill. This, in turn, possibly took its name for its relative proximity to the May River, the source of which is 38 km directly east. 4
Maybelle River 16-19-108-6-W4 58° 24' N 110° 59' W Flows north-west into Richardson Lake, approximately 178 km north of Fort McMurray Named around 1915 after the wife of F.V. Seibert, DLS, ALS. 4
McCarty, Mount 17-5-4-W5 49° 23' N 114° 30' W Approximately 23 km west south-west of Beaver Mines M.P. Bridgland named this mountain in 1915 but it is not known for whom it is named. 1
McCord, Mount 9-47-5-W6 53° 02' N 118° 39' W Approximately 44 km west north-west of Jasper William C. McCord was the head of the Canadian Pacific Railway trail-making party of 1872. This 2,511 m mountain was named after Mr. McCord in 1923 by A.O. Wheeler. 1
McIvor River 12-25-107-13-W4 58° 19' N 112° 02' W Flows north into Lake Claire approximately 171 km north north-west of Fort McMurray It was named after 1915 after Dan McIvor, an axeman on a Dominion Land Survey party working in the area that year. 4
McLean Creek 91-9-W4 56° 53' N 111° 25' W Flows north-west into the Athabasca River approximately 15 km north of Fort McMurray The creek was officially named in 1925 after M.C. McLean, an instrument man on a 1914-1915 survey crew. The name was submitted by S.C. Ellis. 4
McLeod Lake NE-7-104-10-W4 58° 01' N 111° 39' W Approximately 136 km north of Fort McMurray The lake was named in 1916 after G.W. McLeod, DLS, ALS. 4
McLeod Lake 32-80-1-W5 55° 59' N 114° 07' W Approximately 90 km north-west of Slave Lake The name has appeared on maps as early as 1918. The origin of the name is not known but the person after whom it was named may have worked on a survey crew. 4
McPhadden Close South of McPhadden Way, west of 119 Street, Edmonton John Riley McPhadden (1863-1945) was a pioneer farmer in the Edmonton area. Born in Ontario, McPhadden came west to Winnipeg in 1892. There, he became part of the McGrath survey party, travelling with them to Calgary. After working for a while, freighting between Edmonton and Calgary, he found employ with John Walter, operating the ferry between Edmonton and Strathcona. He is most remembered for his farming contributions. 5
Meikle River 19-94-21-W5 57° 10' N 117° 22' W Flows south-east into Notikewin River, approximately 29 km north north-east of Manning It was named after McKay Meikle, bookkeeper and timekeeper for the survey party of J.R. Akins, 1915-1916. Meikle apparently fell into the river and had to be fished out by the crew who named the river for him. 4
Melvin River 28-117-21-W5 59° 11' N 117° 31' W Flows north-west into Hay River, approximately 77 km north north-west of High Level It was apparently named by J.R. Akins, DLS, during his 1914 survey of the 30th Baseline, as this name was recorded in his field correspondence. 4
Meridian Lakes SW-17-122-5-W5 59° 35' N 114° 50' W Approximately 178 km north-east of High Level The name for these lakes was officially approved in 1967 and describes their location on the 5th Meridian. 4
Merlin Creek 21-82-13-W6 56° 08' N 119° 58' W Flows north into Peace River approximately 75 km west north-west of Spirit River The name was submitted by R.W. Cautley, DLS, ALS, after having been asked by the Surveyor General to provide a name for the creek. The significance of the name is not precisely known. 4
Midway Peak 32-19-W5 51° 48' N 116° 39' W Approximately 100 km north-west of Banff on the Alberta-BC boundary The descriptive name for this 2,871 m mountain peak was officially approved July 2, 1918. A.O. Wheeler noticed it was located "midway" between Stairway Peak and Mount Synge. 1
Mildred Lake 8-93-10-W4 57° 03' N 111° 35' W Approximately 37 km north north-west of Fort McMurray This lake was named after Mildred Tarpenny, daughter of the caretaker of the Hudson's Bay Company shipyards/ The name was recorded by A.D. Griffin, DLS, during his survey of the area in 1914. 4
Mina, Lake 17-45-1-W6 52° 53' N 118° 07' W Approximately 2 km north-west of Jasper This lake was named in 1914 by H. Matheson of the Dominion Land Survey. The origin of the name is unknown. 1
Miquelon Lakes 30-49-20-W4 53° 15' 15” N 112° 55' 00” W Approximately 63 km south-east of Edmonton These lakes may have been named for P.A. Miquelon (1834-1899) in 1895. This land surveyor came west from Quebec in 1883 and was the first to survey the lake. Another source suggests that the person after whom the lakes were named was a close friend of the chief surveyor. 3
Mistanusk Creek 5-64-13-W6 53° 30' 15” N 119° 55' 15” W Flows north-west into British Columbia, approximately 100 km south-west of Grande Prairie Recorded in 1918 by the surveyors on the Alberta-British Columbia Boundary Commission, mistanusk is a Cree word referring to the badger, which were abundant in the area. 4
Mooney Creek 14-2-73-6-W5 55° 18' N 114° 48' W Flows north into Lesser Slave Lake, just west of Slave Lake It may have been named after E. Mooney who served as rear chainman with W.G. McFarlane in his surveys along the 19th and 20th baselines. 4
Moose Creek 7-19-35-8-W5 51° 55' 00” N 115° 11' 48” W Flows north-east into Clearwater River, approximately 41 km south south-west of Rocky Mountain House The name for this feature was originally proposed by J.A. MacDonald of the Dominion Land Survey. He noted that it was a well-established local name, due to the number of moose found in the area. The name "Moose Creek" was not approved because it was said to be too common. Since that time, because of the fact that the name was so popular, Fish & Wildlife proposed that the name Moose Creek be made official. The name was made official February 7, 1983. 3
Moose Portage Sw-14-72-26-W4 55° 13' N 113° 52' W Approximately 55 km east of Slave Lake The "moose portage" was mentioned by the Dominion Land Surveyors in 1913 close to where the post office was established. A 1918 map does show a trail running from near the Athabasca River north to Paul Lake and Fawcett Lake. The surveyor's field notes mention the plentitude of moose, so the post office likely took the older name. 4
Morkill Pass 19-54-12-W6 53° 40' N 119° 45' W Approximately 49 km west south-west of Grande Cache This 1,656 m pass was named in 1923 after D.B. Morkill, a land surveyor from British Columbia. The nearby mountain takes its name from this pass. 1
Morro Peak 10-47-1-W6 53° 02' N 118° 04' W Approximately 17 km north of Jasper The descriptive name for this 1,678 m peak is Spanish for "round hill." The name was applied to this feature in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. The creek takes its name from the peak. 1
Mossleigh 30-20-24-W4 50° 43' N 113° 20' W Approximately 55 km south-east of Calgary One source states that this hamlet was named by Joseph and Elizabeth Moss, after themselves, and for his mother's maiden name, Leigh. Joseph Higginsbothan Saxon Moss came west with a Dominion Government Survey in 1879. Moss freighted supplies during the North West Rebellion of 1885 before settling and farming three quarter sections of land. 2
Muir Lake 8-77-13-W5 55° 40' N 116° 00' W Approximately 85 km west north-west of Slave Lake Although the person after whom this lake is named is not known, it may have been for W. Muir, a picketman for W.G. McFarlane, DLS. 4
Mulligan Creek 12-81-7-W6 56° 00' N 118° 57' W Flows south-east into Hamelin Creek, approximately 36 km east of Fairview J.D. Mulligan served as a cook for J.B. St. Cyr, DLS, who was surveying the area in 1907-1910. 4
Murray Creek 1-69-11-W5 54° 56' N 115° 32' W Flows north-east into Sutherland Creek approximately 60 km south-west of Slave Lake It is named in 1906 after David Murray, a chainman on a survey party who worked in the area. 4
Murray Island 13-65-1-W4 54° 37' N 110° 00' W Approximately 22 km north north-east of Cold Lake on the Alberta-Saskatchewan boundary The name for this island in Cold Lake commemorates Bert Murray, a member of an early survey party. 3

Narraway River - Quitting Lake

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Narraway River 20-66-13-W6 54° 44' N 119° 55' W Flows north in Wapiti River, approximately 74 km west south-west of Grande Prairie This river was officially named in 1923 after A.M. Narraway, DLS, who was the Controller of Surveys in Ottawa. His duties took him to the 120th Meridian and this river in 1922. 1
Nash Lake NE-2-105-5-W4 58° 05' N 110° 42' W Approximately 148 km north of Fort McMurray The name shows on maps as early as 1919. It was likely named after J. Nash, an axeman on F.V. Seibert's surveying crew. Seibert and G.H. Blanchet, DLS, and their crews worked on the 27th Baseline during the seasons from 1915 to 1918. 4
Nassawald Peak 23-12-W5 51° 00' N 115° 39' W Approximately 20 km south of Banff on the Alberta-BC boundary This 2,995 m mountain peak was named in 1913 after Nasswald Austria. This was the birthplace of Conrad Kain, a member of a survey party who climbed the peak in that year. 1
Neath Creek 15-13-73-1-W4 55° 19' N 110° 01' W Flows south-west into Calder River, approximately 100 km north of Cold Lake This name appears on a federal government map as early as 1913. J.N. Wallace, DLS, ALS, stated in 1916 that it was named after a place in Wales. 4
Needle Peak 26-41-2-W6 52° 33' N 118° 12' W Approximately 38 km south south-west of Jasper The name for this 2,850 m mountain peak, given by A.O. Wheeler in 1922, is descriptive of the outline of the summit. 1
Newby River 22-81-4-W4 56° 01' 53” N 110° 31' 43” W Flows south-west into Winefred River via Hook Lake approximately 93 km south south-east of Fort McMurray This river is named after W. Newby, a member of a survey party. Earlier names were recorded by the surveyor Philip Turnor. 4
Ney Lake NW-12-124-1-W4 59° 46' N 110° 01' W Approximately 339 km north north-east of Fort McMurray on the Alberta-Saskatchewan boundary The name has appeared on federal government maps since at least 1946 and is named after Cecil Herman Ney, DLS, from Ontario. 4
Ninemile Point 26-73-7-W5 55° 21' N 114° 58' W Approximately 12 km west north-west of Slave Lake On the shore of Lesser Slave Lake, Ninemile Point was a well-established stopping place for freighters when the Dominion Land Surveyors were working in the area in 1913. It was named for its distance from Sawridge (later the community of Slave Lake). 4
Nisbet Lake 34-73-2-W4 55° 22' N 110° 13' W Approximately 95 km north of Cold Lake The origin of the name of this lake is unknown. The name appears on the baseline surveys of 1912. It may have been named for a survey crew member. 4
Noire, Roche 26-44-3-W6 52° 49' N 118° 19' W Approximately 22 km south-west of Jasper The descriptive name for this 2,878 m mountain peak refers to its black summit. Noire is French for black. M.P. Bridgland applied the name to this peak in 1916. 1
North Vermilion Settlement 25-108-13-W5 58° 24' N 116° 02' W Approximately 65 km east south-east of High Level It was originally surveyed in river lots in 1906 by J.B. St. Cyr, DLS. Locally, the settlement has the nickname of "Buttertown" after an incident during the late 19th century or early 1900s when some rancid butter was sold. 4
North Wabasca Lake 1-80-25-W4 55° 59' N 113° 55' W Approximately 95 km north-east of Slave Lake The name was recorded by th Dominion Land Survey in 1913. It is from the nearby Wabasca River. 4
O'Beirne Mountain 26-45-5-W6 52° 55' N 118° 37' W Approximately 36 km west of Jasper This 2,560 m mountain was named in 1918 by A.O. Wheeler. It is named after "O.B," (Eugene Francis O'Beirne) who travelled across Western Canada with the Overlanders and Reverend John McDougall and was left at Fort Edmonton. 1
Ochre Creek 29-87-15-W5 56° 33' N 116° 22' W Flows south-west into Golden Lake approximately 67 km north-east of Peace River The name likely indicates either the presence of ochre on the creek's banks or possibly ochre-coloured water. The name was recorded as early as 1912 by A.H. Hawkins, DLS. 4
Okotoks 28-20-29-W4 50° 44' N 113° 59' W Approximately 90 km south of Calgary This town began as a Canadian Pacific Railway station in 1894. At that time, it was called Dewdney, after Edgar Dewdney. The province of British Columbia was his destination in 1859, and he surveyed there for several years. The locality of Dewdney remained his namesake only until 1897 when it was changed to Okotoks. 2
Oldman Creek Flowing north into the North Saskatchewan River, 21 km north-east of Edmonton city centre, north of 137 Avenue, west of 33 Street east Oldman Creek, located within the City of Edmonton's limits, is said to have been named after the local Old Man's Knoll, over which a historic trail passed from Edmonton to Fort Garry. The name of Oldman Creek was noted as early as 1882 by the Dominion Land Survey. 5
Ole Buck Mountain 24-7-W5 51° 04' N 114° 51' W Approximately 45 km west of Calgary This 1,905 m mountain was officially named December 12, 1939. It appears on A.O. Wheeler's map but the origin is unknown. 1
Osborn River 16-90-13-W6 56° 48' N 112° 00' W Flows west into British Columbia, approximately 130 km north-west of Peace River It was named after G. Osborn, a chainman on the 1911 survey party of James R. Akins, DLS. 4
Palliser Range 28-12-W5 51° 23' N 115° 34' W Approximately 15 km north of Banff This range is noted on the Palliser map of 1859. The range and nearby pass are named for Captain John Palliser (1817-1887) who commanded an expedition between 1857-1860 to explore and survey the country between the 49th parallel and the North Saskatchewan River. 1
Parker Lake 5-25-70-5-W5 55° 05' N 114° 37' W Approximately 25 km south south-east of the Town of Slave Lake After whom this was named is not known; it was named some time between 1914 and 1922, so this might mean it was named after a survey crew member. 4
Pasque Mountain 14-5-W5 50° 09' N 114° 36' W Approximately 60 km south-west of Turner Valley This 2,451 m mountain was named by M.P. Bridgland in 1914 due to the abundance of pasque flowers found near its summit. 1
Patricia Lake 29-45-1-W6 52° 54' N 118° 06' W Approximately 6 km north-east of Jasper This slim, narrow lake was named in honour of Her Royal Highness, Princess Patricia Connaught, daughter of His Royal Highness, the Duke of Connaught, Governor General of Canada, from 1914-1916. The name was applied in 1914 by H. Matheson of the Dominion Land Survey. 1
Paxton Lake 2-107-5-W4 58° 16' N 110° 42' W Approximately 169 km north north-east of Fort McMurray The lake was named in 1917 after F.R. Paxton, who likely worked on a survey crew. 4
Pearce 1-10-25-W4 49° 48' N 113° 16' W Approximately 32 km west north-west of Lethbridge Named in 1910 after William Pearce. 2
Pearson Crescent West of 199 Street, south of Potter Greens Drive, Edmonton Manitoba-born Hugh E. Pearson (1887-1979) was a WWI veteran and a broadcasting pioneer. He came to Alberta in 1906 where he worked as a Dominion Land Surveyor and Alberta Land Surveyor. Pearson retired in 1970 and was appointed to the Order of Canada in 1976. 5
Pearson Lake 22-103-8-W4 57° 57' N 111° 14' W Approximately 137 km north of Fort McMurray Named in 1914 after H.E. Pearson, DLS, ALS. It is also known locally as Sandy Lake. 4
Peavine Creek 16-76-22-W5 55° 36' N 117° 21' W Flows south-west into Little Smoky River approximately 60 km west of High Prairie The name was recorded by the Dominion Land Surveyors in 1905 and is descriptive of the prevalence of the plant in the area. 4
Pengelly, Mount 27-6-5-W5 49° 30' N 114° 36' W Approximately 16 km south south-west of Coleman, on the Alberta-BC boundary Pengelly was the family name of the wife of A.J. Campbell, who was an assistant to A.O. Wheeler on the Alberta-British Columbia Boundary Survey. The name for this 2,560, mountain was officially approved in January 1917. 1
Peters Lake 1-121-1-W4 59° 29' N 110° 02' W Approximately 310 km north north-east of Fort McMurray on the Alberta-Saskatchewan boundary Two explanations have been given for the origin of the name. Since it was named in 1939 and since it lies just to the west of the Alberta-Saskatchewan border, the most likely explanation is that it was named after F.H. Peters, the chairman of the Sakatchewan-Alberta Boundary Commission. 4
Peters, Mount 18-33-14-W5 51° 49' N 116° 00' W Approximately 80 km north-west of Banff This 2,850 m mountain was named in 1928 by R.W. Cautley after Frederick Hathaway Peters, OBE, DLS, ALS. Peters had a long and distinguished career. He was the Surveyor General of Canada from 1924-1948. 1
Pinto Creek 8-16-69-10-W6 54° 58' 00” N 119° 28' 00” W Flows north into Wapiti River, approximately 45 km west south-west of Grande Prairie When Arthur St. Cyr, DLS, was surveying the 6th Meridian, he worked south from Grande Prairie and arrived in this area in the fall. Supplies were becoming low so he sent two men ahead with horses to pick up supplies at a cache on Prairie Creek. The men became lost and matters grew desperate. St. Cyr kept on and where the meridian crossed what is now Pinto Creek, he shot a horse (Holmgren, 1976). Pinto is the Spanish word for painted, referring to the colouration on the horses. 4
Place LaRue 100 Avenue north to Stony Plain Road, 170 Street west to Anthony Henday Drive Stanislaus LaRue (born 1860) was a surveyor, scout, and pioneer businessman. Born in Canada East, LaRue came to Edmonton in 1883 where he worked as a surveyor and served as a scout during the North-West Rebellion (1885). 5
Plavius Lake 28-87-23-W5 56° 34' N 117° 35' W Approximately 41 km north north-west of Peace River The precise origin of the name of this lake is unknown. It was first recorded in 1913 as Plevius by G.A. Tipper, DLS, ALS. By 1915, the spelling had changed to its current form. Pluvius is an ancient Roman epithet for Jupiter the rainmaker, so perhaps the survey crew encountered rainy weather when working in the area. 4
Ponita Lake SE-19-75-12-W6 55° 31' N 119° 50' W Approximately 72 km west north-west of Grande Prairie It is apparently a Cree word, the root of which means terminate or end. In 1916, J.N. Wallace, DLS, ALS, said the lake represented the finish of the survey session when the Dominion Lands Survey first came through the area in 1909. 4
Ponton River 12-109-14-W5 58° 27' N 116° 11' W Flows south-east into Boyer River, approximately 56 km east south-east of High Level This river was named after A.W. Ponton, DLS, ALS. The Beaver name for this stream is Kaska Sake or Kaska Woti Sake. 4
Poplar Creek 30-91-9-W4 56° 55' N 111° 27' W Flows north-east into Athabasca River, approximately 22 km north of Fort McMurray The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown; it is probably descriptive. It was noted as early as 1914 in the field notes of A.D. Griffin, DLS. 4
Powder Creek 12-35-116-9-W4 59° 07' N 111° 25' W Flows north-west into Slave River approximately 257 km north of Fort McMurray The name was noted in 1916 by J.A. Fletcher, DLS. Its origin is not known. It may refer to actual powder or it may refer to the Powder family. 4
Prairie Creek 27-88-9-W4 56° 39' N 111° 21' W Flows north north-west into Hangingstone River approximately 8 km south of Fort McMurray The creek was probably named at a time when it ran through a prairie area, an uncommon topographical feature in the vicinity of Fort McMurray. The name was recorded in 1912 by A.J. Tremblay, DLS, ALS. 4
Prest Creek 17-50-20-W5 53° 18' N 116° 53' W Flows east into Embaras River approximately 44 km south-west of Edson The name for this creek was suggested by Dr. Rutherford of the Alberta Research Council during the course of the railway survey of 1910-1911. It commemorates Benjamin J. Prest, born in England in 1884, who came to Canada in 1904. He was a member of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway survey party of 1910 and, in later years, joined the staff of the Department of Lands and Mines. 1
Priddis 22-23-3-W5 50° 53' N 114° 20' W Approximately 28 km south-west of Calgary Charles Priddis hailed from Paris, Ontario and came west with a survey crew, looking after their horses. In 1884, his party had a winter camp south of Calgary at the confluence of the two branches of Fish Creek, a point later to be known as "Forks." In 1886, Charles Priddis returned here to homestead and with the passage of time, others came to settle in the district. When a meeting was held to decide a name, the unanimous choice was Priddis. 2
Ptolemy, Mount 9-7-5-W5 49° 33' N 114° 37' W Approximately 13 km south-west of Coleman Mount Ptolemy was named by A.O. Wheeler owing to its resemblance in shape to a man sitting with his arms folded. The name was offically approved November 2, 1915. It has also been suggested that this 2,815 m mountaint may have been named for the celebrated astronomer by the name of Ptolemy who lived in ancient times. 1
Purdy Lake 4-109-3-W4 58° 26' N 110° 26' W Approximately 191 km north of Fort McMurray It was named after E.B. Purdy, a leveller of D.F. McEwen's survey crew working in the area in 1916. 4
Puskwaskau Lake 20-72-24-W5 55° 15' N 117° 39' W Approximately 30 km north-west of Valleyview Puskwaskau is a Cree word roughly translated as "short grass." This describes some of the land surrounding the lake and how the lake and river were named. Documentation shows the name has been in use since at least 1914 when it is referred to in the field notebooks of the Dominion Land Surveyor who went through the area during that season. 4
Queenstown 26-19-22-W4 50° 38' N 112° 56' W Approximately 85 km south-east of Calgary Named in 1888 by Captain Dawson, who was surveying for the Canadian Government. The following year, he formed the Canadian Pacific Colonization Company with English capital. Advertisements for the colonists to take up land in Queenstown was effective. The settlement was named after Queenstown (now Cobb), Ireland, Dawson's native city. 2
Quitting Lake 35-88-3-W5 56° 40' N 114° 20' W Approximately 155 km north north-east of Slave Lake The precise origin of the name of this lake is unknown; the name of the lake was noted as early as 1912 in the survey notes of A.H. Hawkins. It may refer to the point at which a survey season ended, or the point at where someone gave up on whatever project they were working at the time. 4

Rae, Mount - Ruth Lake

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Rae, Mount 24-19-8-W5 50° 37' N 114° 59' W Approximately 48 km west of Turner Valley Dr. John Rae (1813-1893) was a Scottish explorer and surgeon to the Hudson's Bay ship in 1833. He became resident surgeon at Moose Fort in 1835. His career in exploration began in 1846 and continued until 1864 when he conducted the survey for a telegraph line from Red River Settlement to the Pacific Coast. This 3,218 m mountain was named by Sir John Hector after Dr. John Rae. 1
Raft Lake 36-85-1-W4 56° 25' N 110° 01' W On Alberta-Saskatchewan border, approximately 93 km east south-east of Fort McMurray This lake apparently takes its name from the time when surveyors used a raft to cross it. There were survey crews working in the area between 1910 and 1915. 4
Rainbow Lake 16-107-8-W6 58° 17' N 119° 16' W Approximately 21 km south of the Town of Rainbow Lake According to the fiels of the Geographic Board of Canada, the name for the lake was supplied by C.B.C. Donnelly, DLS, ALS. According to his notes, this lake was called Rainbow by local Cree and Slavey because of its shape. The Slavey, Beaver and Cree have traditionally known this lake as Long Lake, in their respective languages. 4
Rajah, The 29-49-4-W6 53° 16' N 118° 33' W Approximately 53 km north-west of Jasper The name of this 3,018 m mountain peak is the word for "king" in Hindi, an official language of India. The name was applied to the feature by R.W. Cautley of the Alberta Boundary Commission and later of the National Parks Branch. 1
Rat Creek 16-102-9-W5 57° 51' N 115° 25' W Flows east north-east into Wabasca River approximately 124 km south-east of High Level The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown; it is likely named for the prevalence of the muskrat. The name was noted as early as 1908 by J.B. St. Cyr, DLS. 4
Rathlin Lake 14-45-2-W6 52° 52' N 118° 11' W Approximately 7 km west of Jasper The name for this lake was applied in 1914 by H. Matheson, DLS. The origin of the name is unknown. 1
Rattlepan Creek 12-89-2-W4 56° 42' N 110° 11' W Flows north-west into Clearwater River, approximately 74 km east of Fort McMurray The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown. It was noted as early as 1910 in the field notes of J.N. Wallace, DLS, ALS. 4
Redan Mountain 11-48-2-W6 53° 08' N 118° 11' W Approximately 27 km north north-west of Jasper This 2,560 m mountain is situated at a bend in the ridge with steep rock walls to the east. The descriptive name was applied in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. A redan is a military field word describing two faces forming a salient angle. 1
Redwillow River 7-4-70-9-W6 55° 02' N 119° 18' W Flows south-east into Wapiti River approximately 30 km west of Grande Prairie Named for the abundance of red willow along the feature. The name has been in use since at least 1909 when a Dominion Land Surveyor went through the area. 4
Rennie Creek 1-111-3-W5 58° 36' N 114° 22' W Flows south-east into Waldo Creek, approximately 161 km east north-east of High Level Named after J. Rennie by J.R. Akins, DLS, during his survey of the 29th Baseline. Rennie was a packer on Akins' crew. 4
Reunion Peak 10-42-3-W6 52° 36' N 118° 20' W Approximately 36 km south-west of Jasper During the Alberta-British Columbia Boundary Survey, there was a station link up with other stations located on this peak, ie: a reunion point. 1
Richardson Lake 22-108-7-W4 58° 24' N 111° 04' W Approximately 177 km north of Fort McMurray Named after a member of a survey party, it appears on federal government maps as early as 1919. It was first noted as Jackfish Lake by J.R. Akins, DLS, in 1917. 4
Richardson River 15-34-108-8-W4 58° 25' N 111° 14' W Flows north into Athabasca River approximately 180 km north of Fort McMurray Named after a member of J.B. McFarlane's 1911 survey crew, it appears on a federal government map of 1919. It has been identified by a Chipewyan as Whitefish River, and was noted by J.R. Akins, DLS, in 1917, as Silva Creek. 4
Rink Lake 25-45-5-W6 52° 54' N 118° 36' W Approximately 34 km west of Jasper The name of this lake was applied in 1918 by A.O. Wheeler. 1
Rockyford 22-26-23-W4 51° 14' N 113° 08' W Approximately 42 km south-west of Drumheller Rockyford was named by the First Nations peoples because the main channel of the Serviceberry Creek was too narrow and deep to cross; the Indians used the rocky ford to cross on their way to Gleichen. Later, the ranchers used the name, and in 1908, the surveyors used it for surveying the right of way to Calgary. This ford was 0.4 km south of the present townsite. Rockyford was officially named by a Mr. Beaumont, chief surveyor of the Canadian Northern Railway, in 1914. 2
Roddy Creek 18-57-8-W6 53° 55' N 119° 10' W Flows north-east into Smoky River, approximately 5 km north north-west of Grande Cache The name of this creek may be taken from Rod McCrimmon, a young packer and guide who was a member of the survey party for the final line of the Grand Trunk grade. 1
Rodney Creek 19-51-8-W5 53° 25' N 116° 39' W Flows north-west into Embarras River, approximately 23 km south-west of Edson The creek was named in 1910 after a member of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway survey party. The name was officially approved December 3, 1957. No other information is available. 1
Roe River 36-117-21-W5 59° 13' N 117° 26' W Flows north-west into Hay River, approximately 79 km north north-west of High Level The precise origin of the name of this river is unknown but was likely named by J.R. Akins, DLS, during the 1914 survey of the area. The name is referred to in his field correspondence. Roe may refer to a person or it may refer to fish eggs which, under the name of caviar, is considered a delicacy by some. 4
Rowe, Mount 22-1-1-W5 49° 03' N 114° 03' W Approximately 9 km west of Waterton Park, on the Alberta-BC boundary The name Mount Rowe was officially approved March 16, 1917. The 2,452 m mountain was named after Lt V.F. Rowe, RE, who was the surveying officer for the International Boundary Commission of 1872-1876. 1
Roy Gate Joining Roy Street and Rabbit Hill Road, west of Ronning Street, Edmonton Quebec-born Georges Roy (1846-1932) born in Canada East was a Dominion Land Surveyor and Edmonton's first civil servant. Roy was appointed registrar of the Edmonton-based North Alberta Land District in 1885. He came to Edmonton and worked in the Land Titles Office for 26 years. 5
Ruis Creek NE-21-107-22-W4 58° 18' N 113° 36' W Flows south into Birch Creek, approximately 203 km east of High Level It was named after J. Ruis, a packer on the J.R. Akins survey team, which worked in this area in the summer of 1918 along the 28th Baseline. 4
Russell Creek 19-96-13-W5 57° 20' N 116° 06' W Flows north-west into Wolverine River, approximately 103 km east north-east of Manning Named in 1915, after John Russell, DLS. 4
Russet Creek 26-119-23-W5 59° 22' N 117° 50' W Flows south-east into Steen River, approximately 101 km north north-west of High Level The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown, although it may be descriptive of the reddish-brown or yellowish-brown colour of the water. The name appears in the 1915 field notes of J.R. Akins, DLS. 4
Ruth Lake 16-92-10-W4 56° 58' N 111° 33' W Approximately 29 km north north-west of Fort McMurray After whom it is named is not known; it appears in the 1914 field notes of A.D. Griffin, DLS. 4

Salient Mountain - Syson Lake

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Salient Mountain 8-47-5-W6 53° 02' N 118° 43' W Approximately 45 km west north-west of Jasper The name for this 2,810, mountain was applied in 1923 by A.O. Wheeler. 1
Sand River 7-99-15-W4 57° 34' N 112° 27' W Flows south-west into Gardiner Lakes approximately 129 km north north-west of Fort McMurray The precise origin of the name of this river is unknown; it is probably descriptive. William Christie, DLS, during his survey of the area referred to it as Punk River. The Surveyor General found the term objectionable. Therefore, Sand River became its official name. 4
Saskatoon Hill 9-10-72-9-W6 53° 13' N 119° 17' W Approximately 40 km west of Grande Prairie The name for this hill, 912 metres in altitude, is descriptive of the abundance of saskatoon bushes in the area. The name was recorded by the Dominion Land Survey when its crews were in the area in the early 1910s. 4
Saunders Creek 19-40-12-W5 52° 27' N 115° 43' W Flows south into North Saskatchewan River, approximately 24 km east of Nordegg This creek was named after B.J. Saunders, DLS, ALS, the commissioner for Ontario on the Ontario-Manitoba boundary survey in 1897. He surveyed the 11th Baseline in 1908. 1
Scarp Mountain 22-42-3-W6 52° 38' N 118° 21' W Approximately 33 km south-west of Jasper A "scarp" is a steep slope of cliff. This steep sloped mountain was given its descriptive name in 1922 by A.O. Wheeler. 1
Seibert Lake 4-21-66-9-W4 54° 43' 04” N 111° 18' 00” W Approximately 42 km east of Lac La Biche The name of this lake has been official since 1918 and commemorates Frederick Victor Seibert (1885-1966), Dominion and Alberta Land Surveyor, who surveyed this area and a large parcel of country stretching all the way to the Saskatchewan border circa 1916. 3
Shand Creek 22-56-4-W6 53° 51' N 118° 31' W Flows north into Lone Teepee Creek, approximately 40 km east of Grande Cache This creek was named in 1947 in honour of John Shand-Harvey (1880-1968), a pioneer who arrived in Edmonton in 1905. He was a homesteader, trapper, and a forest ranger. He surveyed baselines and was a packer for railways and mountaineers. One of Shand-Harvey's first jobs was with the surveying firm of Driscoll and Knight. 1
Shanks Lake 26-1-27-W4 49° 04' N 112° 43' W Approximately 65 km south of Lethbridge This feature was named after Thomas Shanks (1869-1926) who was Director General of Surveys for the Dominion Land Survey from 1914-1924. 2
Shaver River 26-69-1-W4 54° 59' N 110° 11' W Flows south-east into Saskatchewan approximately 55 km north north-east of Cold Lake. The name for this river was officially adopted July 2 1945 and commemorates P.A. Shaver (1869-1960), Dominion Land Surveyor, who was engaged in railway construction and irrigation projects near Calgary and Red Deer and surveyed in the Peace Country. 3
Shekilie River 16-119-12-W6 59° 21' N 120° 00' W Flows west into British Columbia, approximately 100 km north north-west of Rainbow Lake It was labelled Shikilie River on a Peace River sketch map of 1913 and is an aboriginal word meaning "between two hills"and is descriptive. It was noted by a surveyor on the Alberta-British Columbia Boundary Commission, 1950-1953, as being locally known as Rabbit Creek. 4
Shelley Creek 35-95-9-W4 57° 17' 10” N 111° 24' 45” W Flows north-west into Muskeg River approximately 63 km north of Fort McMurray The precise origin of this name, given to the creek by surveyors, is unknown. 4
Sidney Creek 2-69-14-W5 54° 57' N 116° 02' W Flows north-west into East Prairie, approximately 60 km south south-east of High Prairie It appears on a federal government map of 191, and the creek crosses the 18th Baseline. It is named after Sidney Parnall, of Edmonton, a member of a survey party. 4
Signal Mountain 10-45-28-W5 50° 52' N 117° 58' W Approximately 9 km east of Jasper This 2,255 m mountain was given its name in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. This was a site used by forest rangers to watch for forest fires. A telephone was located near the summit of this mountain in order to signal any reports of fire in the area. 1
Sinclair Creek 19-20-73-12-W6 55° 20' N 119° 49' W Flows south into Beaverlodge River, approximately 65 km west north-west of Grande Prairie In 1916, J.N. Wallace, DLS, ALS, stated it was named after Tom Sinclair of Grande Prairie, a member of a survey party. 4
Sled Island 13-108-11-W5 58° 23' N 115° 42' W In Peace River, approximately 82 km east south-east of High Level Sled Island is a translation of the Cree name. In the late 19th century, the Cree used to make their toboggans here due to the excellent birch trees that grew on the island. This island was recorded as Sledge Island in 1883 by W.T. Thompson, DLS, during a survey of the Peace River. It was annotated as Sled Island on the 1915 township map, following the surveys of A.W. Ponton, ALS, (1910) and J.S. Galletly (1913). 4
Smith Creek 7-42-18-W5 52° 36' N 116° 35' W Flows north into Blackstone River, approximately 37 km west north-west of Nordegg The name for this creek was given in 1907 by H.L. Seymour, DLS, ALS, after one of the men employed staking coal claims in the area. 1
Snowfall Creek 13-104-13-W6 58° 02' N 120° 00' W Flows north north-west into British Columbia approximately 64 km south south-west of Rainbow Lake This name was given by surveyors because of a snowfall occurring in August while they were camped at this creek during the Alberta-British Columbia Boundary Survey, 1950-1951. 4
Sock Lake 13-99-13-W6 57° 36' N 119° 59' W Approximately 118 km south south-west of Rainbow Lake This name was applied during the Alberta-British Columbia Boundary Commission survey as descriptive of its shape. 4
Sofa Mountain 1-29-W4 49° 03' N 113° 47' W Approximately 50 km south south-east of Pincher Creek Named by M.P. Bridgland, this 2,520 m mountain has a peculiar formation on its northern shoulder which extends along the south side of Middle Waterton Lake like a giant couch. The name was officially approved October 15, 1915. 1
South Heart River 12-76-15-W5 55° 34' N 116° 11' W Flows south into Buffalo Bay, approximately 25 km north-east of High Prairie Surveyors' field notes from 1911 show this as Heart River; however, some time before 1950 that name was changed to Harmon River. In 1950, the name was changed to South Heart River, which referred to its position relative to the Heart River and better reflected local usage. 4
Spedden 34-59-12-W4 54° 08' N 111° 43' W Approximately 33 km west north-west of St. Paul There is some confusion over the origin of the name. One source maintains that the station here was first called "Ashmont" and the first post office was called "Cache Lake." According to this source, one of the workers in the surveying party, a Mr. Spedden, died during construction and the hamlet was subsequently named in his honour. 3
Spirit Ridge 17-77-7-W6 55° 40' N 119° 02' W Approximately 16 km south-west of Spirit River Officially named in 1958 at the request of Alberta Surveys and Mapping, this 914 metre hill was probably named for its proximity to Spirit River. J.B. St. Cyr recorded the name for this feature in 1904 as Old Ranch Mountains. 4
Spring-Rice, Mount 35-23-W5 52° 01' N 117° 14' W Approximately 110 km south-east of Jasper, on the Alberta-BC boundary Sir Cecil Arthur Spring-Rice, KCMG (1839-1918), was a British diplomat and ambassador to the United States. A.O. Wheeler named this 3,275 m mountain after him in 1920. 1
St. Nicholas Peak 3-31-18-W5 51° 38' N 116° 29' W Approximately 85 km north-west of Banff There is a striking formation on the side of this peak that A.O. Wheeler thought resembled Santa Claus, or St. Nicholas. The name for this 2,970 m mountain peak was officially approved January 14, 1909. 1
Stairway Peak 6-32-19-W5 51° 48' N 116° 39' W Approximately 100 km north-west of Banff on the Alberta-BC boundary This 2,999 m mountain was named by A.O. Wheeler in 1918. The name is descriptive of the formation, which resembles a stairway up the side of the peak. 1
Starlight Range 52-5-W6 53° 27' N 118° 40' W Approximately 75 km north-west of Jasper The name for this range containing Arcturus, Sirius and Vega peaks was officially adopted May 1, 1934. R.W. Cautley named the peaks, and it is likely he also named the range. 1
Stebbing Creek 36-69-14-W5 54° 56' N 116° 01' W Flows west into Sidney Creek, approximately 57 km south-east of High Prairie It appears on a federal government map of 1917, and since the creek follows the 18th Baseline, it is likely the name of a survey crew member. 4
Steen River 3-122-19-W5 59° 35' N 117° 10' W Flows north-east into Hay River, approximately 117 km north of High Level It was named by J.R. Akins, DLS, in his 1915 survey of the 6th Meridian. A.S. Steen was the cook on Akins' survey. 4
Stewart Canyon 32-26-11-W5 51° 16' N 115° 30' W Approximately 12 km north north-east of Banff In 1886, George A Stewart, DLS, was commissioned to survey the area and furnish plans for a proposed townsite. He became the superintendent of the new park (now Banff National Park) in 1887, a position he held for ten years. This canyon was named after him. 1
Stewart, Mount 33-37-21-W5 52° 13' N 116° 57' W Approximately 105 km south-east of Jasper Louis B Stewart, DLS, DTS (1861-1937) accompanied by A.P. Coleman on a few expeditions in the Rockies during the late 1800s. He was a professor of surveying and geodesy at the University of Toronto. The name for this 3,312 m mountain was made official March 5, 1935. 1
Stoney Island 8-91-9-W4 56° 52' N 111° 26' W On Athabasca River approximately 18 km north of Fort McMurray The name was recorded in 1914 as Stony Island by A.D. Griffin, DLS, and is likely descriptive. 4
Stowe Creek 7-92-22-W5 56° 58' N 117° 32' W Flows south-east into Notikewin River, approximately 8 km north-east of Manning The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown, it likely was named after a survey crew member. The name appears on a federal government map as early as 1919. 4
Strawberry Creek 17-73-10-W5 55° 20' N 115° 34' W Flows north-east into Swan River, approximately 40 km west of Slave Lake The name was mentioned in the Dominion Land Surveys report of 1908, and is likely descriptive of the wild strawberries found along its banks. 4
Strawberry Ridge 32-9-W5 51° 48' N 115° 15' W Approximately 70 km north north-east of Banff This ridge was first named by M.P. Bridgland and was officially approved November 25, 1941. The precise origin of the name is unknown. 1
Stud Creek 36-30-9-W5 51° 37' N 115° 09' W Flows east into Burnt Timber Creek, approximately 55 km north-east of Banff This creek was named by M.P. Bridgland in 1917. The origin of the name is unknown. 1
Suicide Creek 7-5-3-W5 49° 22' N 114° 23' W Approximately 17 km south-west of Beaver Mines M.P. Bridgland named this creek June 30, 1915. No other origin information is available. 1
Sunset Peak 9-52-7-W6 53° 29' N 118° 59' W Approximately 89 km north-west of Jasper This 3,265 m mountain peak was named in 1929 by R.W. Cautley. The name is likely descriptive. 1
Sunshine Creek 5-25-13-W5 51° 07' N 115° 46' W Flows north into Healy Creek approximately 16 km south-west of Banff The creek was named by A.O. Wheeler and was officially approved in 1958. No other information is known. 1
Surette Lake 1-108-17-W5 58° 20' 45” N 116° 41' 00” W Approximately 32 km south-east of High Level Named in 1914 by P.M.H. LeBlanc, DLS, after his field assistant, Germain Augustin Surette, during a township survey. Surette, a native of Ottawa, received his commission as a Dominion Lands Surveyor in March 1927. 4
Surprise Point 6-43-2-W6 52° 40' N 118° 16' W Approximately 26 km south-west of Jasper It took the climbing party longer to reach the top of this 2,400 m peak longer than expected. The descriptive name was attached to this feature in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. 1
Survey Hill 23-43-8-W4 52° 43' N 111° 04' W Approximately 18 km south-west of the town of Wainwright This name for this hill, located in the Wainwright Regional Training Area, may be descriptive. 3
Survey Peak 36-34-21-W5 51° 57' N 116° 51' W Approximately 120 km north-west of Banff This 2,334 m peak was named in 1898 by J.N. Collie. He and H.E.M. Stuffield, an English climbing companion, climbed the peak in order to commence a plane table survey of the area. 1
Sutton Creek 30-90-3-W4 56° 50' N 110° 27' W Flows west into High Hill River, approximately 59 km east north-east of Fort McMurray This creek is named for Gordon Sutton, a member of a survey party in the area. It shows on a federal government map as early as 1914. 4
Swan Hills 14-66-10-W5 54° 43' N 115° 24' W Approximately 75 km south-west of Slave Lake The New Townsite of Swan Hills was established in 1959 because of the various companies that undertook works in the Swan Hills oilfield. At one point, there was consideration being given to name the town Chalmers, after Thomas Chalmers, the Dominion Land Surveyor who came through the area in 1897. 4
Sweezy Creek 1-16-79-1-W4 55° 50' N 110° 05' W Flows west into Landels River approximately 120 km south-east of Fort McMurray The origin of the name is not known; the name appears on a federal map of 1917. The creek may have been named after a survey crew member. 4
Syncline Mountain 2-5-4-W5 49° 21' N 114° 26' W Approximately 21 km south-west of Beaver Mines According to the Alberta and British Columbia Boundary Survey, Part 1 (1917), Syncline Mountain was named after "a very apparent physical feature." The entire formation of this 2,441 m feature comprises a syncline, which is "a fold in which the bed has been forced down in the middle, or up on the sides to force to form a trough. The rim of this syncline has three peaks, rising a further 152 to 213 metres. 1
Syson Lake 25-35-13-W4 52° 02' N 111° 43' W Approximately 5 km south of Coronation This lake was named after Richard M. Syson who originally came to Canada as a Barr Colonist in 1903. He homesteaded 10 km north of Stettler and died in February of 1958. He was given the opportunity to name the lake following a survey party custom that called for each man to name a lake. 3

Talbot Lake - Utopia Mountain

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Talbot Lake 33-97-11-W5 57° 28' N 115° 43' W Approximately 140 km south-east of High Level The name appears as early as 1916 on federal government maps; the lake was likely named after a survey crew member. 4
Tallon Peak 26-7-3-W5 49° 35' N 114° 19' W Approximately 4 km north-east of Bellevue There are two possible origins of the name of this mountain. One source states that the name is spelled "Tallon" after L. Tallon, an assistant to W.S. Drewry in surveys of the Rocky Mountains in 1888 and 1892. 1
Tar River 14-96-11-W4 57° 19' N 111° 40' W Flows south-east into Athabasca River, approximately 69 km north north-west of Fort McMurray This name is probably descriptive of exposed oil sands along the river bank. The name was noted in 1914 by J.B. McFarlane, DLS, ALS. 4
Tarpeian Rock 32-41-20-W5 52° 34' N 116° 50' W Approximately 50 km west north-west of Nordegg This rock was named by R.W. Cautley because it reminded him of the cliff from which criminals of ancient Rome were killed. 1
Tate Creek 22-119-23-W5 59° 21' N 117° 52' W Flows south-east into Steen River, approximately 101 km north north-west of High Level The precise origin of the name of this creek is unknown. It was noted by J.R. Akins, DLS, during his survey in 1915. 4
Taylor Lake 7-27-15-W5 51° 18' N 116° 06' W Approximately 40 km west north-west of Banff This lake was named for George Herbert Taylor, a packer for A.O. Wheeler on his Dominion Topographic Surveys. 1
Tecumseh, Mount 20-8-9-W5 49° 40' N 114° 38' W Approximately 11 km west north-west of Coleman This mountain, which is 2,549 m in altitude, has the name of Tecumseh (Shooting Star), a great Shawnee Indian Chief (1768-1813), who fought alongside Sir Isaac Brock's British troops against American invaders in the War of 1812. Recommended by M.P. Bridgland, the name became official May 2, 1957. 1
Tent Mountain 14-7-6-W5 49° 33' N 114° 42' W Approximately 17 km south-west of Coleman, forming part of the Alberta-BC boundary Proposed by M.P. Bridgland, the name was officially approved April 4, 1911. The shape of the mountain, which is 2,197 m in altitude, is likened to that of a tent; hence its name is appropriately descriptive. 1
Tepee Creek 18-125-14-W5 59° 52' N 116° 26' W Flows north-east into Yates River, approximately 154 km north north-east of High Level Its source is Tepee Lake. The name was submitted for approval in 1932 by C.B.C. Donnelly, DLS, ALS. 4
Tepee Lake 36-85-26-W4 56° 23' N 113° 59' W Approximately 159 km west south-west of Fort McMurray The name for this feature was recorded by A.W. Ponton, DLS, ALS, as Woodenhouse Creek in 1908. By 1915, the name is recorded on a map as Tepee Creek; therefore the name is likely descriptive. 4
Terminal Mountain 12-44-2-W6 52° 46' N 118° 09' W Approximately 12 km south-west of Jasper This 2,835 m mountain is located at the end of a ridge. Its descriptive name was suggested by M.P. Bridgland and was officially approved in 1916. 1
Thornbury Lake NW-34-76-11-W4 55° 38' N 111° 39' W Approximately 80 km north north-east of Lac La Biche William Thornbury was an axeman on the 1912 survey crew working in this area. 4
Thunder Mountain 21-10-3-W5 49° 50' N 114° 21' W Approximately 25 km north of Blairmore Named by M.P. Bridgland on June 30, 1915, this mountain measures 2,352 m in altitude. The origin of the name is unknown. 1
Tonquin Hill 26-43-3-W6 52° 44' N 118° 20' W Approximately 23 km south-west of Jasper This hill was named by Eduoard Deville, Surveyor General of Canada, in 1916 to commemorate the ship, "The Tonquin," which carried the Asper expedition to the mouth of the Columbia River in 1810. The ship, anchored in Clayoquot Sound, Vancouver Island, was attacked by Indians, who slew most of the crew. The survivors blew up the ship, killing all who remained on board. The nearby hill features take their names from this 2,396 m hill. 1
Tony Creek 23-62-21-W5 54° 22' N 117° 03' W Flows east into Little Smoky River, approximately 95 km north-west of Edson The name shows on a federal government map as early as 1916; although its origin is not known, it may have been named after a survey crew member. 4
Tornado Mountain 5-12-5-W5 49° 58' N 114° 39' W Approximately 40 km north-west of Coleman on the Alberta-BC boundary M.P. Bridgland recommended approval for the name of this 3,236 m mountain in 1915. The name is descriptive in that the mountain appears to be the storm centre of the locality. Storm clouds and lightning flashes are rumoured to be seen around the summit quite frequently. 1
Torrens, Mount 23-61-14-W6 54° 17' N 119° 59' W Approximately 75 km west north-west of Grande Cache This mountain, which is 2,220 m in altitude, was named in 1922 on the suggestion of R.W. Cautley. Sir Robert Richard Torrens (1814-1888) emigrated to Australia in 1840 from Ireland. He introduced the well-known Torrens System of Land Titles in 1858. 1
Towers, The 22-12-W5 50° 53' N 115° 36' W Approximately 105 km west of Calgary, on the Alberta-BC boundary The name is descriptive of the numerous turrets seen on this 2,846 m mountain. A.O. Wheeler gave this feature its name in 1917 and the name was made official in 1918. 1
Traverse Creek 24-75-15-W4 55° 31' N 116° 12' W Flows south-east into Lesser Slave Lake, approximately 100 km south-east of Peace River Common belief states this name is a misspelling of the surname of the homesteaders who lived there, Sidney and Oliver Travers. The Dominion Lands Survey notes do show that Traverse Creek bordered the lands cleared by Oliver Travers. A "traverse" is the term used to describe the distance covered on any given day of field work done by a survey crew. Was this a deliberate pun? The Travers brothers moved to the Grouard area in 1899 after having made an unsuccessful attempt at a journey to the Klondike a year before. 4
Treadmill Ridge 49-7-W6 53° 13' N 118° 54' W Approximately 65 km west north-west of Jasper The descriptive name for this ridge was applied in 1923 by A.O. Wheeler. 1
Trefoil Lakes 22-45-1-W6 52° 53' N 118° 03' W Approximately 3 km north-east of Jasper The group of three lakes comprising this feature is arranged in a trinity resembling the petals of a clover leaf. The descriptive name was applied in 1914 by H. Matheson of the Dominion Land Survey. 1
Twin Lake 8-18-76-19-W4 55° 35' N 112° 58' W Approximately 90 km north north-west of Lac La Biche The origin is not precisely known. However, it may date from the time of the survey in 1913 when owing to water levels, there appeared to be two lakes joined by a narrow strip of water. 4
Twin Lakes 11-26-15-W5 51° 12' N 115° 59' W Approximately 29 km north north-west of Banff The descriptive name of these two small lakes was suggested by M.P. Bridgland in 1915. 1
Tyne Lake 4-109-1-W4 58° 26' N 110° 07' W Approximately 196 km north north-west of Fort McMurray Likely named after a crew member along a survey of the 28th Baseline that was done in the mid-1910s. The 28th Baseline falls between townships 108 and 109. 4
Underwood Lake 5-73-3-W4 55° 17' N 110° 25' W Approximately 100 km north of Cold Lake The origin of the name is not known. It appears on federal government maps as early as 1917. Perhaps it was named after a member of the survey party. 4
Utikuma River 2-83-7-W5 56° 10' N 114° 40' W Flows north north-east into Muskwa Lake, approximately 98 km north of Slave Lake This name is a variation of the Cree name for "whitefish," which are likely plentiful in the river. A.H. Hawkins, DLS, records the name Whitefish River for this feature in his notes during the 1910 survey season. 4
Utopia Mountain 32-47-26-W5 53° 06' N 117° 46' W Approximately 39 km south south-west of Hinton This 2,602 m mountain was the surveyors' refuge from flies. It was named in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. 1

Vam Creek - Yates River

Name Legal Lat/Long Location Description Source
Vam Creek 3-31-8-W5 51° 38' N 115° 03' W Flowa north into Red Deer River, approximately 60 km north-east of Banff The name Vam Creek was taken from field notes of 1959-1960, from the Department of Highways Surveys Branch. No information about the origin was given. 1
Vardie River 20-113-7-W6 58° 50' N 119° 08' W Flows south south-west into Mega River approximately 39 km north north-east of Rainbow Lake The name was recorded by E.W. Hubbell, DLS, during his survey of the Zama-Hay Lakes area. According to the files of the Geographic Board of Canada, when it was to be officially named in 1922, it was then locally known by its Slavey name, which was transliterated into Vardi. This means amber, referring to the colour of the water. It "happily coincided" with the maiden name of J.F.B. O'Sullivan's mother which was Vardie. According to Mr. O’Sullivan’s granddaughter, Bernadette Giblin, it was actually the nickname of his fiancé, Vera Hope DeCordes. Blake O'Sullivan surveyed and drew the map of the area. His family has an original coloured pencil drawing of the Vardie River and Hay Lake. 4
Vega Peak 25-51-6-W6 53° 26' N 118° 45' W Approximately 75 km north-west of Jasper This 2,491 m mountain peak is part of the Starlight Range. It was named by R.W. Cautley after the star, "Vega," which is the fourth brightest star in the night sky. 1
Vertex Peak 34-43-2-W6 52° 45' N 118° 12' W Approximately 16 km south-west of Jasper This 2,957 m mountain peak has a very sharp triangular summit. Its descriptive name was applied to this feature by M.P. Bridgland in 1916. 1
Vesta Creek 10-101-1-W6 57° 45' N 118° 03' W Flows north-west into Keg River, approximately 95 km north north-west of Manning When J.R. Akins, DLS, first noted that name in the 1915 survey, it was transcribed as Vista Creek, which may have been in reference to the view from its banks. Somehow, the name changed. There may be another explanation. "Vesta" is defined as a short wooden match, in reference to the Roman household goddess of the hearth. Whethera connection grew between the feature and matches is not known. 4
Victor Creek 9-36-71-W4 55° 12' N 110° 00' W Flows into Saskatchewan, approximately 75 km north of Cold Lake Possibly named after Victor Gay, of Lloydminster, member of a survey party. The name appears as early as 1914 on a federal government map. 4
Victor Lake 35-56-8-W6 53° 53' N 119° 05' W Approximately 2 km east of Grande Cache There is some suggestion that the lake may be named after Victor Gay, a member of a local survey party, but the precise origin of the name is unknown. 1
Victoria Peak 13-4-2-W5 49° 18' N 114° 08' W Approximately 25 km south-west of Pincher Creek This mountain peak was named by J.J. McArthur, DLS, in 1915 after Queen Victoria (1819-1901). 1
Victoria, Mount 3-28-17-W5 51° 23' N 116° 17' W Approximately 60 km west north-west of Banff on the Alberta-BC boundary The mountain, which is 3,464 m in altitude, was named in 1897 by J.J. McArthur, a Dominion Land Surveyor, who introduced the system of photography for the survey of Rocky Mountains in 1887. The mountain commemorates Queen Victoria (1819-1901). 1
Vincent Lake 19-59-9-W4 54° 06' N 111° 20' W Approximately 13 km north of St. Paul The name for this lake has appeared on the survey returns of A.F. Cotton, Dominion Land Surveyor, who made the original survey in this district in 1884; however, the precise origin for the name is unknown. 3
Waddell Creek 16-9-79-6-W4 55° 50' N 110° 52' W Flows east into Christina River, approximately 110 km south of Fort McMurray Named after W.H. Waddell, ALS, who was working in the area in 1915. 4
Wadlin Lake 4-101-115-31 57° 44' N 115° 35' W Approximately 124 km south-east of High Level Likely names after L.N. Wadlin, DLS. The name appears on a federal government map was early as 1916. 4
Waldron Bay Saskatchewan Named after John Waldron, ALS. He surveyed hundreds of mineral claims in the North, out of Flin Flon, Manitoba. In the early days of Flin Flon, for five years, he was the city engineer. He was on the Dominion Government Township surveys out of Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan in private practice. He has a bay named after him in Tyrrell Lake on map 63L16 at Latitude 54 degrees and 55 minutes, Longitude 102 degrees and 06 minutes. 6
Wallace Creek 29-95-1-W4 57° 16' N 110° 08' W Flows south-west from Saskatchewan into Firebag River, approximately 98 km north-east of Fort McMurray This feature was named after J.N. Wallace, DLS, ALS, who surveyed the east outline of this township, which is the Alberta-Saskatchewan border, in 1910. By 1914, it appears on a federal government map under this name. 4
Wallace Mountain 69-13-W5 54° 58' N 115° 48' W Approximately 60 km south-west of Slave Lake Named after James Nevin Wallace, DLS, ALS, (1870-1941). The name was officially approved in 1906. It is one of three features which comprise Swan Hills. 4
Wallace River 15-33-69-14-W5 55° 02' N 116° 04' W Flows north-east into East Prairie River, approximately 178 km east of Grande Prairie Likely named after James Nevin Wallace, DLS, ALS (1870-1941). The name was officially approved in 1906. 4
Wally Lake 21-120-8-W6 59° 27' N 119° 19' W Approximately 102 km north of Rainbow Lake The name Wally Lake was submitted by Bjorn Rustad, ALS, following his survey in 1964. The lake is probably named after Charles Walton (Wally) Youngs who was, at the time of naming, Director of Surveys. 4
Ward Lake 19-66-17-W4 54° 44' 06” N 112° 33' 57” W Approximately 40 km west of Lac La Biche The name for this lake appeared on a list of names submitted by C.P. Hotchkiss, Dominion Land Surveyor on January 21, 1922. It was named after a draftsman on his survey party. 3
Warwick Mountain 6-38-25-W5 52° 14' N 117° 35' W Approximately 80 km south-east of Jasper Due to this feature's castellated appearance and its proximity to Mount King Edward, a name taken from Warwick Castle, Warwickshire England, was adopted. The mountain was named by A.O. Wheeler and measures 2,906 m in altitude. 1
Wash Creek 21-76-15-W5 55° 36' N 116° 16' W Flows south into the South Heart River approximately 25 km north-east of High Prairie The creek is mentioned by name in the DLS notes of 1906 in which it was described as having a rapid current. No origin information has been recorded; it may have been a place where washing was done, or it may refer to a geological term meaning soil swept off by water. 4
Watchtower, The 33-44-27-W5 52° 49' N 117° 50' W Approximately 17 km east south-east of Jasper The descriptive name for this mountain, whose peak stands like a tower, was given in 1916 by M.P. Bridgland. 1
Watt, Mount 20-111-21-W5 58° 38' N 117° 29' W Approximately 28 km north-west of High Level It was likely named by J.R. Akins, DLS, in 1914 after a colleague, G. Watt, DLS. Among local Slavey and Beaver residents, this mountain is known as Deni Lede Yihe, which means "partly burnt mountain." 4
Waugh Lake 36-124-1-W4 59° 48' N 110° 01' W Approximately 343 km north north-east of Fort McMurray Officially named in 1939, it takes its name from B.W. Waugh, the surveyor in charge of the portion of the Saskatchewan-Alberta Boundary Commission survey between Lake Athabasca and the 60th Parallel. 4
Webber Lake Manitoba Named after G.E.G. Webber, ALS. South-east of God's Lake at Latitude 54 degrees and 28 minutes, Longitude 94 degrees and 00 minutes. 6
Weekes Lake NE-25-123-1-W4 59° 43' N 110° 01' W Approximately 334 km north north-east of Fort McMurray Named in 1954 in honour of M.B. Weekes, former Director of Surveys in Saskatchewan. In the late 1930s, he was the Saskatchewan member of the Saskatchewan-Alberta Boundary Commission. His brother, Abel Seneca Weekes, was an Alberta Land Surveyor. 4
Wheeler Flats 11-2-W5 51° 05' 30” N 115° 46' 30” W Approximately 17 km south-west of Banff Wheeler Flats was named for A.O. Wheeler (1860-1945). The name was officially adopted October 20, 1983. 1
Whitecrow Mountain 30-41-2-W6 52° 34' N 118° 15' W Approximately 37 km south-west of Jasper A number of Clark's Crow (commonly known as the white crow) were seen on this 2,831 m mountain while some members of The Alpine Club of Canada were on it. A.O. Wheeler applied the name in 1922. 1
Winefred Lake 75-W4 55° 30' N 110° 31' W Approximately 118 km north north-west of Cold Lake It is the source of Winefred River; it was noted in 1910 by William Christie, DLS. 4
Winefred River 20-81-4-W4 56° 02' N 110° 36' W Flows west into Christina River approximately 90 km south south-east of Fort McMurray Named by R.E. Young, for his wife, Winefred. 4
Wolverine River 14-101-19-W5 57° 45' N 116° 59' W Flows north-west into Peace River, approximately 84 km south of High Level The precise origin of the name of this river is unknown; it is indicative of the presence of the wolverine. The name was referred to in the 1913 field notes of J.A. Fletcher, DLS. 4
Wood Buffalo National Park 116-16-W4 59° 15' N 113° 15' W Approximately 260 km north north-west of Fort McMurray and east north-east of High Level This, the largest national park in Canada, is named for the herds of wood buffalo seen there by surveyors in 1916. They were termed "wood buffalo" because they inhabited the wooded parkland. 4
Yates River 31-126-12-W5 60° 00' N 116° 05' W Flows north-east into the Northwest Territories, approximately 175 km north north-east of High Level It was officially named in 1946 after it was submitted by M.G. Cameron, DLS, honouring Constable R.N. Yates, of the RCMP, who was stationed at Fort Vermilion. 4

Credits

Most of the information on this page was collected from the four-volume set Place Names of Alberta.

1 Place Names of Alberta Volume I Mountains, Mountain Parks and Foothills by Aphrodite Karamitsanis

2 Place Names of Alberta Volume II: Southern Alberta by Aphrodite Karamitsanis

3 Place Names of Alberta Volume III: Central Alberta by Tracey Harrison

4 Place Names of Alberta Volume IV Northern Alberta by Merrily K. Aubrey

5 Naming Edmonton by the City of Edmonton

6 Jack Webb, ALS